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The Resource Fenway and Hattie, Victoria J. Coe

Fenway and Hattie, Victoria J. Coe

Label
Fenway and Hattie
Title
Fenway and Hattie
Statement of responsibility
Victoria J. Coe
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"An excitable Jack Russell terrier named Fenway and his Favorite Short Human, Hattie, move to the suburbs and must adjust to the changes that come with their new home"--
Member of
Tone
Character
Review
  • Grades 4-6 A cocky Jack Russell terrier struggles to make sense of changes in his world when he moves with Fetch Man, Food Lady, and his favorite short human, Hattie, from a city apartment to a suburban house. Added to the usual challenges of protecting his family from squirrels and passing trucks, there are all sorts of exciting new sights and smells to investigate—not to mention a pair of new doggy neighbors (“’Sup, ladies?”). But Hattie’s meeting new friends and suddenly leaving him out of all her games and activities. Fenway may not understand Hattie’s behavior, but readers looking through his uncomprehending eyes will follow her ups and downs easily as she adjusts to the move. They’ll also wince in sympathy as she tries, with mixed success, to train, or even restrain, her barky, hyper, emotional pet. Eventually, once Fenway gets the connection between obeying commands like “sit” and “stay” and getting treats, the way is (mostly) clear. “Making Hattie happy is a big job,” he concludes. “But luckily, I’m a professional.” -- Peters, John (Reviewed 01-01-2016) (Booklist, vol 112, number 9, p89)
  • Gr 4 – 6 — Fenway narrates the story of his move with Hattie, Food Lady, and Fetch Man from an apartment near a community dog park to a house with its own dog park. Fenway is a Jack Russell terrier who is so fiercely protective of his girl, Hattie, that he jumps, lunges, and barks furiously and incessantly in the presence of delivery men, squirrels, and even the muffins the new neighbor brings over. The hard, glistening floor in the Eating Place "terrorizes" him, and he whines with a "pathetic face" until Hattie brings him food to the carpeted hallway. Fenway is sad when Hattie abandons him to play with her new neighbor and when he's put in a room behind a Gate after he breaks his leash to protect Hattie from the Truck Man with ice cream. Eventually, his people take him to a place where he learns to stay, lie down, and leave a toy. Readers will relate to Fenway's impulsivity and delight in descriptions from his dog's-eye view. Teachers and adults will appreciate generous sprinklings of rich vocabulary. Fenway's first-doggie perspective is not as complex as McKinley's in Avi's The Good Dog (Atheneum, 2001) or Squirrel's in Ann M. Martin's A Dogs Life: Autobiography of a Stray (Scholastic, 2005), and the tight in-home focus of this story wears a little thin. But dog lovers will enjoy spending some time with Fenway as he adjusts to his new home in the suburbs. VERDICT A solid addition to larger collections.—Laura Scott, Farmington Community Library, MI --Laura Scott (Reviewed January 1, 2016) (School Library Journal, vol 62, issue 01, p86)
  • This perky, pet-centered tale, first in a planned series, takes readers inside the head of Fenway, an energetic and perpetually hopeful Jack Russell terrier with a deep love for food, intense hatred of squirrels, and undying adoration of his “small human,” Hattie. When the family moves from the city to the suburbs, the adjustment is hard for Fenway: there’s a slippery new “Wicked Floor” to traverse and a dog park without any dogs (i.e., the backyard). Worst of all, Hattie seems more interested in friends and softball than games of fetch. “Nothing can bring a short human back,” the dogs next door explain, but Fenway is determined not to lose Hattie, even if that means learning some new tricks. Coe, making her children’s book debut, describes the trauma of the move and Hattie growing up through the excitable dog’s eyes, nose, and playful vocabulary (thunder is “boom-kabooms” and Hattie’s parents are “Fetch Man” and “Food Lady”) turning Fenway’s everyday routines into a fun, fresh frolic that animal-loving kids are sure to enjoy. Ages 8–12. Agent: Marietta Zacker, Nancy Gallt Literary Agency. (Feb.) --Staff (Reviewed November 30, 2015) (Publishers Weekly, vol 262, issue 48, p)
  • Fenway, a young, exuberant Jack Russell terrier, is having lots of trouble getting his "short human," Hattie, to behave. The family's move from the city to the suburbs just complicates matters. First, there is the issue of the very slippery kitchen floor. After losing his footing the first time, Fenway refuses to venture out there again, even if it is the Eating Place. The backyard, which he perceives as an unpopulated Dog Park, is another issue, since nasty squirrels scamper through and Hattie climbs into a treehouse—squirrel house?—that he can't reach. The two neighbors next door, a couple of jaded dogs, don't improve things. Hattie is reluctantly learning to throw and catch a white ball in a big, fat glove and for some reason doesn't welcome his enthusiastic help. And finally, there is the issue of the big group of dogs Hattie keeps taking him to visit, with whom he must learn to sit in order to receive treats. Fenway's first-person point of view is appropriately frisky, even slightly berserk at times. But the jokes are used and then reused and begin to turn from funny into tedious repetition. More books in the series are promised; here's hoping some new doggy dilemmas will emerge. Young dog lovers will enjoy Fenway's point of view, even if his eagerness wears a bit thin. (Fiction. 8-10)(Kirkus Reviews, November 15, 2015)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10470398
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Coe, Victoria J
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • 500L
  • Decoding demand: 90 (very high)
  • Semantic demand: 100 (very high)
  • Syntactic demand: 70 (high)
  • Structure demand: 88 (very high)
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Interest level
MG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 4
  • 6
Reading level
3.6
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Fenway and Hattie
Series volume
0001
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Jack Russell terrier
  • Dogs
  • Human-animal relationships
  • Moving, Household
Target audience
pre adolescent
Label
Fenway and Hattie, Victoria J. Coe
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1494412
Extent
1 volume
Isbn
9780399172748
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2015009117
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780399172748
  • (OCoLC)908250413
Label
Fenway and Hattie, Victoria J. Coe
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1494412
Extent
1 volume
Isbn
9780399172748
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2015009117
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780399172748
  • (OCoLC)908250413

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Howson BranchBorrow it
      2500 Exposition Blvd., Austin, TX, 78703, US
      30.2982508 -97.7675915
    • Little Walnut Creek BranchBorrow it
      835 W. Rundberg Lane, Austin, TX, 78758, US
      30.3632362 -97.6984619
    • Manchaca Road BranchBorrow it
      5500 Manchaca Road, Austin, TX, 78745, US
      30.2166039 -97.79733689999999
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