Coverart for item
The Resource Facing Ali : the opposition weighs in, Stephen Brunt

Facing Ali : the opposition weighs in, Stephen Brunt

Label
Facing Ali : the opposition weighs in
Title
Facing Ali
Title remainder
the opposition weighs in
Statement of responsibility
Stephen Brunt
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Brunt provides penetrating and honest profiles of 15 fighters from around the world who faced Muhammad Ali, and he produces a book that should become one of the essential works for understanding the legendary fighter. Brunt's subjects range in chronological order from Tunney Hunsaker, the first man to fight Ali (then known as Cassius Clay) as a professional, to Larry Holmes, whose crushing victory in Ali's fourth comeback showed that the champion's career was truly finished. In between, Brunt (columnist for Toronto's Globe and Mail ) offers bracing new looks at Ali's well-known opponents, including Joe Frazier, Ken Norton and George Foreman. Some of Brunt's best portraits, however, bring to life those "extremely unlikely tales, longshots, no-hopers, fighters lifted out of obscurity for their date with the most famous man on earth," such as Germany's Jurgen Blin, who fought Ali and the next day "was back at work at the sausage factory." Although each story varies, Brunt is amazingly sensitive to and respectful of each fighter's own words, no matter how factually wrong or self-serving they might be. He deftly illustrates how all the fighters to some degree believe that, as Jean Pierre Coopman says, "The Ali fight was the defining moment of my career," although this feeling is ironic for some, such as George Chuvalo, who despite his winning record became better known in his native Canada for going the distance with Ali and losing. Others are bitter, such as Joe Frazier, who views Ali's current Parkinson's disease unsympathetically; as Brunt cannily observes, "on the cosmic scale, [Frazier's] getting even." (May) Forecast: Facing Ali should be as coveted as other recent popular works on Ali to which it compares favorably, such as David Remnick's King of the World and Mark Kram's Ghosts of Manila. --Staff (Reviewed March 31, 2003) (Publishers Weekly, vol 250, issue 13, p53)
  • Canadian sportswriter Brunt fills in the background as boxers tell of their experiences in the ring with Muhammad Ali."In boxing, as in everything else, only one side of the story tends to be told," writes Brunt, and when that story involved Ali, one voice was certainly heard above the others. So the journalist takes it as his task to tell Ali's opponents' stories: how they felt about facing him, and how these fights altered the course of their careers. The writing is hard and ungussied, much like the men. Some of them, like dementia-afflicted Tunney Hunsaker, can't speak much, and other significant opponents have been permanently silenced. (Readers will regret the absence of Sonny Liston, whose death left two unanswered questions that nag at every fight fan: What was on his gloves that blinded Ali? And did he dive in their second fight?) But Sir Henry Cooper makes some bright quips, and Joe Frazier vivifies his antipathy to Ali: "Lord . . . I want you to help me kill that scamboogah," Frazier would pray. More than one boxer knew he was in way over his head. Brian London says, "I gave me best for two or three rounds. But then I realized that I was going to get one hell of a hiding." According to Jean-Pierre Coopman, "It was never a question of winning or losing. Just surviving." Chuck Wepner, later immortalized as Rocky, tells the funniest story. He had bought his wife a negligee the day of the fight, announcing with swagger, "tonight you're going to be sleeping with the heavyweight champion of the world." When he shuffled in after the pulping he received, she asked, "Do I go to Ali's room? Or does he come to mine?" George Foreman, always the canny operator, understood well that he and most of the other guys were financially and professionally lucky just to step into the ring with the Champ.Makes it clear that boxing sure could use an Ali today—or any day. (Photos) (Kirkus Reviews, March 1, 2003)
Biography type
individual biography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
192091
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Brunt, Stephen
Illustrations
portraits
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Ali, Muhammad
  • Boxers (Sports)
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the opposition weighs in
Label
Facing Ali : the opposition weighs in, Stephen Brunt
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
450265
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
301 pages
Isbn
9781585748297
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2003040124
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
portraits
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781585748297
  • (Sirsi) ADJ-2545
  • IG$ 2003040124
Label
Facing Ali : the opposition weighs in, Stephen Brunt
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
450265
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
301 pages
Isbn
9781585748297
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2003040124
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
portraits
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781585748297
  • (Sirsi) ADJ-2545
  • IG$ 2003040124

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
Processing Feedback ...