The Resource Don't let the pigeon drive the bus, words and pictures by Mo Willems

Don't let the pigeon drive the bus, words and pictures by Mo Willems

Label
Don't let the pigeon drive the bus
Title
Don't let the pigeon drive the bus
Statement of responsibility
words and pictures by Mo Willems
Title variation
Dont let the pigeon drive the bus!
Creator
Contributor
Author
Publisher
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
No matter how hard he pleads and begs, the pigeon is not supposed to drive the bus while the driver is away, but pigeon tries every persuasive trick a young child knows to get you to say, "Yes."
Member of
Tone
Writing style
Character
Illustration
Award
  • ALA Notable Children's Book, 2004
  • Booklist Editors’ Choice: Books for Youth, 2003
  • Books I Love Best Yearly (BILBY), Early Reader, 2015.
  • Buckaroo Book Award (Wyoming), 2005.
  • Flicker Tale Children's Book Award (North Dakota) for Picture Books, 2005.
  • Georgia Children's Book Award for Picture Storybook, 2007.
  • Golden Archer Awards (Wisconsin): Primary, 2005.
  • Kentucky Bluegrass Award for Grades K-2, 2005.
  • South Carolina Book Award, Picture Books, 2006.
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ PreS. In his winning debut, Willems finds the preschooler in a pigeon: a cajoling, tantrum-throwing, irresistible bird. “I’ve got to leave for a little while,” says a uniformed bus driver as he strolls off the opening pages. “I thought he’d never leave,” says the big-eyed pigeon as he marches onto the next spread and begins his campaign to drive the bus. His tactics, addressed to an unseen audience, are many: he reasons (“I tell you what: I’ll just steer”); he whines (“I never get to do anything!”); he’s creative (“Let’s play ‘Drive the Bus’! I’ll go first”); he bargains (“C’mon! Just once around the block!”). Finally he erupts in a feather-flying tantrum, followed by a drooping sulk that ends only when a truck arrives, and new road fantasies begin. Librarians may struggle with the endpapers, which contain important story content, but the design is refreshingly minimal, focusing always on the pigeon; he’s the only image on nearly every earth-toned spread. Willems is a professional animator, and each page has the feel of a perfectly frozen frame of cartoon footage--action, remarkable expression, and wild humor captured with just a few lines. Preschoolers will howl over the pigeon’s dramatics, even as they recognize that he wheedles, blows up, and yearns to be powerful just like they do. -- Gillian Engberg (BookList, September 1, 2003, p123)
  • PreS-Gr 2 –A brilliantly simple book that is absolutely true to life, as anyone who interacts with an obdurate three-year-old can attest. The bus driver has to leave for a while, and he makes one request of readers: "Don't let the pigeon drive the bus." It's the height of common sense, but the driver clearly knows this determined pigeon and readers do not–yet. "Hey, can I drive the bus?" asks the bird, at first all sweet reason, and then, having clearly been told no by readers, he begins his ever-escalating, increasingly silly bargaining. "I tell you what: I'll just steer," and "I never get to do anything," then "No fair! I bet your mom would let me." In a wonderfully expressive spread, the pigeon finally loses it, and, feathers flying and eyeballs popping, screams "LET ME DRIVE THE BUS!!!" in huge, scratchy, black-and-yellow capital letters. The driver returns, and the pigeon leaves in a funk–until he spies a huge tractor trailer, and dares to dream again. Like David Shannon's No, David (Scholastic, 1998), Pigeon is an unflinching and hilarious look at a child's potential for mischief. In a plain palette, with childishly elemental line drawings, Willems has captured the essence of unreasonableness in the very young. The genius of this book is that the very young will actually recognize themselves in it.–Dona Ratterree, New York City Public Schools --Dona Ratterree (Reviewed May 1, 2003) (School Library Journal, vol 49, issue 5, p132)
  • The premise of this cheeky debut is charmingly absurd. When a bus driver goes on break, he asks the audience to keep an eye on his vehicle and the daft, bug-eyed pigeon who desperately wants to drive it. The pigeon then relentlessly begs readers for some time behind the wheel: "I tell you what: I'll just steer. My cousin Herb drives a bus almost every day! True story." Willems hooks his audience quickly with the pigeon-to-reader approach and minimalist cartoons. The bluish-gray bird, outlined in black crayon, expresses countless, amusing emotions through tiny shifts in eye movement or wing position. The plucky star peeks in from the left side of a page, and exhibits an array of pleading strategies against window-pane panels in mauve, salmon and willow ("I'll be your best friend," he says wide-eyed in one, and whispers behind a wing, "How 'bout I give you five bucks?"). Finally he erupts in a full-spread tantrum on an orange background, the text outlined in electric yellow ("Let me drive the bus!!! "). When the driver returns and takes off, the bird slumps dejectedly until a big red truck inspires a new round of motoring fantasies. Readers will likely find satisfaction in this whimsical show of emotions and, perhaps, a bit of self-recognition. Ages 2-6. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed February 10, 2003) (Publishers Weekly, vol 250, issue 6, p184)
  • This cinematic adventure, with its simple retro-cartoonish drawings, begins on the opening endpapers when a pale blue pigeon dreams of driving a bus. On the title page, the profile of the strong-jawed bus driver notes in a word bubble that he has to leave for a little while and requests that the reader watch things for him. "Oh and remember: "Don't let the Pigeon Drive the Bus." The text is a handwritten, typewriter-like hand in white word bubbles set on a background of neutral tones of lavender, salmon, celadon, and beige. With the bus in the reader's care, the bus driver nonchalantly strolls away. Turn the page and readers see a close-up of the pigeon, who spends the next 13 well-paced pages begging, pleading, lying, and bribing his way into their hearts. The words "LET ME DRIVE THE BUS!!!" triple in size and leap from the page as the pigeon loses control, flopping across the bottom of the pages. Readers of all ages will nod with recognition of his helplessness and frustration. The bus driver returns, thanks the readers, and drives away, leaving the pigeon with his head hanging in sadness. And just like any young person, he's quickly distracted from his disappointment when a huge truck tire zooms into view. In the end, the pigeon dreams of driving the big red tractor-trailer truck. A first picture book by an Emmy Award–winning writer and animator, listeners will be begging, pleading, lying, and bribing to hear it again and again. (Picture book. 3-5) (Kirkus Reviews, April 1, 2003)
Awards note
  • Caldecott Honor Book, 2004.
  • American Library Association Notable book.
  • Booklist Editors' Choice Books for Youth.
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
121680
Cataloging source
UWB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Willems, Mo
Dewey number
[E]
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • 280L
  • Decoding demand: 21 (low)
  • Semantic demand: 66 (high)
  • Syntactic demand: 31 (low)
  • Structure demand: 79 (high)
  • Toddler
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Interest level
LG
LC call number
PS3623.I555
LC item number
D66 2003
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • -1
  • 2
Reading level
0.9
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Hyperion Books for Children
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Pigeon (Picture books)
Series volume
0001
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Pigeons
  • Buses
  • Wit and humor, Juvenile
  • Bus drivers
  • Pleading
  • Begging
  • Bribery
  • Complaints (Rhetoric)
  • Persuasion (Rhetoric)
  • Frustration
  • Anger
  • Disappointment
  • Trucks
  • Pigeons
  • Bus drivers
  • Anger
  • Begging
  • Bribery
  • Bus drivers
  • Buses
  • Complaints (Rhetoric)
  • Disappointment
  • Frustration
  • Persuasion (Rhetoric)
  • Pigeons
  • Pleading
  • Trucks
  • Wit and humor, Juvenile
Target audience
preschool
Label
Don't let the pigeon drive the bus, words and pictures by Mo Willems
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Art techniques used: Simple, fun cartoon drawings in black pencil with digital color
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
  • Don't let the pigeon drive the bus
  • words and pictures by Mo Willems
  • No dejes que la paloma conduzca el autobús
  • texto e ilustraciones de Mo Willems
Control code
451178
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780786819881
Lccn
2004296657
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780786819881
  • (OCoLC)51815360
Label
Don't let the pigeon drive the bus, words and pictures by Mo Willems
Publication
Note
Art techniques used: Simple, fun cartoon drawings in black pencil with digital color
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
  • Don't let the pigeon drive the bus
  • words and pictures by Mo Willems
  • No dejes que la paloma conduzca el autobús
  • texto e ilustraciones de Mo Willems
Control code
451178
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780786819881
Lccn
2004296657
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780786819881
  • (OCoLC)51815360

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