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The Resource Deaf child crossing, Marlee Matlin

Deaf child crossing, Marlee Matlin

Label
Deaf child crossing
Title
Deaf child crossing
Statement of responsibility
Marlee Matlin
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Despite the fact that Megan is deaf and Cindy can hear, the two girls become friends when Cindy moves into Megan's neighborhood, but when they go away to camp, their friendship is put to the test
Member of
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • Gr. 4-6. Megan hopes she’ll finally have a neighborhood friend when Cindy moves to her block. Indeed, when strong-minded, outgoing Megan, who is deaf, introduces Cindy to her soundless world, she’s delighted to find Cindy eagerly welcoming the overtures of friendship and embarking on learning sign language. The two nine-year-old chums even go away to camp together. Tensions crop up, though, when Cindy tries to help independent Megan at the wrong times, and again when Megan meets another hearing-impaired camper and the two occasionally unwittingly exclude Cindy. Matlin, familiar for her roles in film and on TV, draws on some of her own growing up in this first novel that provides a sensitive depiction of childhood friendship with its fragility, jealousies, and joys. While issues concerning deafness are part of the story, this is as much Cindy’s story as Megan’s, and readers will identify with both girls’ sorrows and successes. (Reviewed November 15, 2002) -- Anne O'Malley
  • Gr 4-6 –When Cindy, who is hearing, moves in down the street from Megan, who is deaf, the nine-year-olds quickly become best friends. Megan wears hearing aids and lip-reads, but the girls become even closer as Cindy begins to learn sign language. Problems crop up when her attempts to be helpful offend Megan's sense of independence, and things get even worse at summer camp, where they meet another deaf girl, Lizzie. While this novel is a solid attempt to chronicle the issues that arise in deaf/hearing friendships, the communication difficulties are often downplayed; for example, Cindy learns to sign in a matter of months and is communicating fluently by the end of camp. The writing, too, is often awkward. Lizzie is never fully realized, though she is the prime catalyst for the conflict between the two main characters. Matlin succeeds, however, in creating a winning, spunky, sometimes frustrating Megan, and if the ending is a bit abrupt or contrived, it is nevertheless in keeping with her actions. Indeed, the story's greatest strength is in demonstrating that the two protagonists' main differences have nothing to do with hearing or the lack of it.–Kathleen Kelly MacMillan, Maryland School for the Deaf, Columbia --Kathleen Kelly (Reviewed December 1, 2002) (School Library Journal, vol 48, issue 12, p144)
  • Matlin, the first deaf actor to win an Academy Award, makes her fiction debut with this problematic novel about a friendship between two nine-year-old girls. Megan, who is deaf, is almost opposite in temperament from her new neighbor, the bookish, shy Cindy, but nonetheless decides that Cindy will be her best friend. Much of the book's tension relies on the girls' best-friend status, but the friendship isn't convincingly developed. Nor are the characters—even though the point of view alternates between the girls, Cindy seems sketchy next to Megan, and neither voice seems authentic (e.g., nine-year-old Megan asks herself what kind of toys the new girl will have). Matlin is at her best when delving into Megan's inner world, such as her heightened sense of smell (her father—like the other parents, distractingly referred to by his first name—claims her deafness sharpens her other senses) or her anger at not being able to use the phone, but generally these moments are fleeting and the conflicts they evoke too neatly resolved. Unfortunately, the pages are riddled with errors in grammar and syntax ("Like any other home, dinnertime was a chance to share events of day"; a paragraph written in the past tense briefly switches to present tense and back; etc.), further undermining the storytelling. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed September 16, 2002) (Publishers Weekly, vol 249, issue 37, p69)
  • Matlin's intimate insights into being American, female, and deaf infuse the character of Megan, a charming, dynamic, and cantankerous girl, excited that a potential friend her age has moved next door. Her new, hearing neighbor, Cindy, has just moved into the most compelling experience of her life, as she becomes the immediate, sworn, off-and-on best friend of an uncommonly accomplished lip-reading girl who doesn't take no—or any type of criticism—lightly. The characters are envisioned in common-place settings living out the American preadolescent experience in an upper-middle-class lifestyle, one where the world that is built for hearing people bends to every strategic move made by Megan. Her experience is only made possible by intense effort and her family's well-adjusted, mature, and kind approach to an active life. Megan has tasted of every good character-building experience, except summer camp; despite her clear objection and her fear of being bored—or worse: ignored—she manages to place herself at the center of everyone's attention. The plot suffers when Matlin loses sight of its pace and inserts overlong explanations of apparatus used by individuals with hearing disabilities; because the information is more informative than descriptive, it impedes the pace which slows to a dead stop. Though the usefulness of the information is high in terms of knowing facts about the common ways that deaf people function, Matlin's story goes beyond bibliotherapy, so it's unfortunate that the simple and rather leaden text will only appeal to a small group. Megan's rather unique character begs a sequel, but for a broader range of readership. (Fiction. 9-11) (Kirkus Reviews, October 1, 2002)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
102999
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Matlin, Marlee
Index
no index present
Interest level
MG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 4
  • 6
Reading level
4.3
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Deaf child crossing
Series volume
0001
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Best friends
  • Friendship
  • Deaf
  • People with disabilities
  • Camps
Target audience
pre adolescent
Label
Deaf child crossing, Marlee Matlin
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
452073
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
200 pages
Isbn
9780689822087
Lccn
2001057589
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780689822087
  • (Sirsi) ADJ-4685
  • IG$ 2001057589
Label
Deaf child crossing, Marlee Matlin
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
452073
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
200 pages
Isbn
9780689822087
Lccn
2001057589
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780689822087
  • (Sirsi) ADJ-4685
  • IG$ 2001057589

Library Locations

    • Manchaca Road BranchBorrow it
      5500 Manchaca Road, Austin, TX, 78745, US
      30.2166039 -97.79733689999999
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