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The Resource Change comes to dinner : how vertical farmers, urban growers, and other innovators are revolutionizing how america eats, Katherine Gustafson

Change comes to dinner : how vertical farmers, urban growers, and other innovators are revolutionizing how america eats, Katherine Gustafson

Label
Change comes to dinner : how vertical farmers, urban growers, and other innovators are revolutionizing how america eats
Title
Change comes to dinner
Title remainder
how vertical farmers, urban growers, and other innovators are revolutionizing how america eats
Statement of responsibility
Katherine Gustafson
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "A fascinating exploration of America's food innovators, that gives us hopeful alternatives to the industrial food system described in works like Michael Pollan's bestselling Omnivore's Dilemma Change Comes to Dinner takes readers into the farms, markets, organizations, businesses and institutions across America that are pushing for a more sustainable food system in America. Gustafson introduces food visionaries like Mark Lilly, who turned a school bus into a locally-sourced grocery store in Richmond, Virginia; Gayla Brockman, who organized a program to double the value of food stamps used at Kansas City, Missouri, farmers' markets; Myles Lewis and Josh Hottenstein, who started a business growing vegetables in shipping containers using little water and no soil; and Tony Geraci, who claimed unused land to create the Great Kids Farm, where Baltimore City public school students learn how to grow food and help Geraci decide what to order from local farmers for breakfast and lunch at the city schools. Change Comes to Dinner is a smart and engaging look into America's food revolution"--
  • "Change Comes to Dinner takes readers into the farms, markets, organizations, businesses and institutions across America that are pushing for a more sustainable food system in America. Gustafson introduces food visionaries like Mark Lilly, who turned a school bus into a locally-sourced grocery store in Richmond, Virginia; Gayla Brockman, who organized a program to double the value of food stamps used at Kansas City, Missouri, farmers' markets; Myles Lewis and Josh Hottenstein, who started a business growing vegetables in shipping containers using little water and no soil; and Tony Geraci, who claimed unused land to create the Great Kids Farm, where Baltimore City public school students learn how to grow food and help Geraci decide what to order from local farmers for breakfast and lunch at the city schools. Change Comes to Dinner is a smart and engaging look into America's food revolution"--
Review
  • Freelance journalist Gustafson undertakes a national "hoperaking" investigation to find some good news in response to dispiriting exposés of the American agricultural industry. She focuses on finding workable alternatives to agribusiness and travels across the United States to find stories of people working to change the way America eats. From a school bus transformed into a roving famer's market in Virginia, to the Roots to Rentry program in the Philadelphia prison system, to vertical farming in shipping containers in Arizona, the diverse cast of pioneering change-agents Gustafson meets expands her definition of sustainability. The food revolution is not just about more wholesome produce; it includes initiatives such as community building, job creation, and food security. VERDICT Both inspiring and realistic, Gustafson's book provides a hopeful assessment of the possibility of big changes in the U.S. food system. Recommended for general readers interested in eating healthy, questioning where their food comes from, or knowing more about the business of farming.— Rebekah Wallin, Paris, France --Rebekah Wallin (Reviewed May 1, 2012) (Library Journal, vol 137, issue 08, p92)
  • Amid numerous stories about the industrial-food complex and its pitfalls, freelance writer and change.org blogger Gustafson seeks examples of what "a better food system" would resemble, traveling across America to find alternatives. In four parts—"Local is as Local Does," "Green Thumbs," "Growing Empowerment" and "How Does Your Garden Grow?"—the author chronicles her experiences with, among others, organic farmers and locavores; a Montana co-op; universities with dining programs that partner with community resources; a hospital with its own garden; online grassroots efforts; agricultural programs that encourage the next generation of farmers; and coordinators of urban greenhouses. Gustafson discovered that such projects, despite enthusiasm, were sometimes beleaguered by logistical problems, and that practical motivations, such as job creation, could also play as significant a role as more idealistic environmental, social-justice and lifestyle concerns. Readers who are familiar with works such as Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma (2006) will appreciate how Gustafson does not examine the darker aspects of getting food from farm to table. Though the examples she provides are not intended as groundbreaking solutions, they present an overview of what is possible. Gustafson's personable approach to a sometimes-controversial topic results in a modulated argument for a food economy that is neither anti-corporate nor solely in favor of small businesses. This is a work of realistic assessments, featuring moments of inspiring optimism. As the author notes about one self-proclaimed "change agent," "when you do what you love with fervor and even ferocity, the universe responds." Recommended for an informed, general audience intrigued by but perhaps just beginning to explore sustainability.(Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2012)
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10114486
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Gustafson, Katherine
Dewey number
641.300973
Index
no index present
LC call number
TD195.F57
LC item number
G87 2012
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / Agriculture & Food
  • COOKING / Essays
  • NATURE / Environmental Conservation & Protection
  • Food industry and trade
  • Food
  • Urban agriculture
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
how vertical farmers, urban growers, and other innovators are revolutionizing how America eats
Label
Change comes to dinner : how vertical farmers, urban growers, and other innovators are revolutionizing how america eats, Katherine Gustafson
Link
http://www.netread.com/jcusers2/bk1388/377/9780312577377/image/lgcover.9780312577377.jpg
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
861910
Extent
pages cm
Isbn
9780312577377
Lccn
2012004625
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(Sirsi) i9780312577377
Label
Change comes to dinner : how vertical farmers, urban growers, and other innovators are revolutionizing how america eats, Katherine Gustafson
Link
http://www.netread.com/jcusers2/bk1388/377/9780312577377/image/lgcover.9780312577377.jpg
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
861910
Extent
pages cm
Isbn
9780312577377
Lccn
2012004625
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(Sirsi) i9780312577377

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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