Coverart for item
The Resource Bruh Rabbit and the tar baby girl, Virginia Hamilton ; paintings by James Ransome

Bruh Rabbit and the tar baby girl, Virginia Hamilton ; paintings by James Ransome

Label
Bruh Rabbit and the tar baby girl
Title
Bruh Rabbit and the tar baby girl
Statement of responsibility
Virginia Hamilton ; paintings by James Ransome
Creator
Contributor
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
In this retelling, using Gullah speech, of a familiar story the wily Brer Rabbit outwits Brer Fox who has set out to trap him
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
  • ALA Notable Children's Book, 2004
  • School Library Journal Best Books, 2003.
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ K-Gr 4 –Hamilton's masterful retelling of the tar baby story brings Bruh Rabbit to Bruh Wolf's well-tended garden, where he just helps himself to the corn and peanuts. A "scarey-crow" doesn't frighten Bruh Rabbit at all, so Bruh Wolf puts up a tar baby girl, "standing black in the moonshine." Bruh Rabbit is perplexed. "This seems like a little girl. I best study upon this here." By the time he's done studying upon that silent girl, he's completely stuck. Bruh Wolf is ready to eat him, but Bruh Rabbit pleads, "… I beg you.… You may roast me and toast me; you may cut me up and eat me. But whatever you do, don't throw me in the briar bush !" Readers familiar with or new to the story will relish the rabbit's sneaky escape. Retold in Gullah, Hamilton's narrative is meticulously paced, lyrical, hilarious, and a joy to read aloud. Ransome's lush watercolors suit the story perfectly; there are expansive double-page paintings as well as full-page pictures that face a page of framed, large-print text. An endnote describes the story's origins, as well as some of the possibly obscure terms. This lovely example of a folktale in picture-book format will be a welcome addition to any library.–Nina Lindsay, Oakland Public Library, CA --Nina Lindsay (Reviewed November 1, 2003) (School Library Journal, vol 49, issue 11, p126)
  • In this sparkling Gullah version of a favorite Brer Rabbit story, the immediacy and quirky originality of the late Hamilton's voice make ordinary prose seem quite dull in comparison. The author balances the dialect just right, capturing the musical sounds and cadences of the language in which the stories were first told while keeping the meaning clear to young readers: "Bruh Wolf planted corn one year, and Bruh Rabbit didn't plant a thing. Rabbit, him," she says, "is tricky-some—about to fool a body and not do a lick of work himself." Her images cunningly prod readers to emphasize words that imitate the action described: "Rabbit sneakity-sneaks along.... He's creeping low-down, slow-down, and he sees the scarey-crow—whoom! —standing still and very white in the shine of the moon." If not quite as witty as Barry Moser's Brer Rabbit, Ransome's (Visiting Day ) characters ably straddle the demands of their folktale roles. They wear human clothing, for example, but their faces are animal-like both in the glassy roundness of their eyes and in their inscrutability. All in all, this version is just about as satisfying as sitting down on a croker sack and hearing the tale first-hand. Ages 4-up. (Oct.) --Staff (Reviewed October 13, 2003) (Publishers Weekly, vol 250, issue 41, p77)
  • /* Starred Review */ Hamilton posthumously revives this archetypal Brer Rabbit tale with a Gullah-inflected rendition, to which Ransome supplies Jerry Pinkney–influenced watercolor scenes of clothed, but naturalistically rendered animals. Finding evidence that lazy Bruh Rabbit's been helping himself to his hard-won crops, Bruh Wolf sets up a rag scarecrow, which fools Bruh Rabbit not a bit, then a tarry, long-eared doe whose silence irritates Rabbit into attacking: "Missy Girl, keeping her mouth shut. Bruh Rabbit took a bite. GUNK! His nose stuck! He sure was one rabbit stuck on somebody!" Young readers may wonder how Bruh Wolf can be canny enough to construct the trap, yet foolish enough to think that chucking his cagey captive into a briar patch would be a punishment—but, that's how the story goes, and the wolf seems only mildly peeved in the final scene. A note on the tale, and on Bruh Rabbit as a character, caps this handsome edition, seemingly destined to become the standard one in libraries. (Picture book/folk tale. 7-9) (Kirkus Reviews, September 15, 2003)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
121872
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1934-2002
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hamilton, Virginia
Dewey number
398.2/089/96073
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • 530L
  • Decoding demand: 55 (medium)
  • Semantic demand: 73 (high)
  • Syntactic demand: 73 (high)
  • Structure demand: 84 (very high)
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Interest level
LG
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 0
  • 4
Reading level
3.2
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Ransome, James
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Brer Rabbit
  • Animals
  • African Americans
  • Folklore
  • Brer Fox (Legendary character)
  • Animals
  • African Americans
  • Folklore
Target audience
primary
Label
Bruh Rabbit and the tar baby girl, Virginia Hamilton ; paintings by James Ransome
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
468683
Dimensions
24 x 28 cm
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780590473767
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2002015529
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780590473767
  • (OCoLC)50859107
Label
Bruh Rabbit and the tar baby girl, Virginia Hamilton ; paintings by James Ransome
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
468683
Dimensions
24 x 28 cm
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780590473767
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2002015529
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780590473767
  • (OCoLC)50859107

Library Locations

    • Carver BranchBorrow it
      1161 Angelina St., Austin, TX, 78702, US
      30.2695584 -97.7240278
    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Howson BranchBorrow it
      2500 Exposition Blvd., Austin, TX, 78703, US
      30.2982508 -97.7675915
    • Little Walnut Creek BranchBorrow it
      835 W. Rundberg Lane, Austin, TX, 78758, US
      30.3632362 -97.6984619
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