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The Resource Bring up the bodies : a novel, Hilary Mantel

Bring up the bodies : a novel, Hilary Mantel

Label
Bring up the bodies : a novel
Title
Bring up the bodies
Title remainder
a novel
Statement of responsibility
Hilary Mantel
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Though he battled for seven years to marry her, Henry is disenchanted with Anne Boleyn. She has failed to give him a son and her sharp intelligence and audacious will alienate his old friends and the noble families of England. When the discarded Katherine dies in exile from the court, Anne stands starkly exposed, the focus of gossip and malice. At a word from Henry, Thomas Cromwell is ready to bring her down. Over three terrifying weeks, Anne is ensnared in a web of conspiracy, while the demure Jane Seymour stands waiting her turn for the poisoned wedding ring. But Anne and her powerful family will not yield without a ferocious struggle. Hilary Mantel's Bring Up the Bodies follows the dramatic trial of the queen and her suitors for adultery and treason. To defeat the Boleyns, Cromwell must ally with his natural enemies, the papist aristocracy. What price will he pay for Anne's head?"--
Member of
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
  • Booklist Editors' Choice, 2012.
  • Costa Book of the Year Award, 2012.
  • Costa Novel Award, 2012.
  • Man Booker Prize, 2012.
  • New York Times Notable Book, 2012.
  • RUSA Reading List, 2013.
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Mantel’s Wolf Hall (2009) took the literary world by storm and was quickly seen as an exceptional interpretation and depiction of Henry VIII’s times and troubles as relayed through the career of Thomas Cromwell, the king’s all-powerful secretary and chief task-enforcer. This new novel, the second installment of a planned Cromwell trilogy, can easily stand next to its predecessor as a major achievement in historical fiction. Mantel now tells the story of the fall of Anne Boleyn, Henry’s second wife. As the novel opens, Queen Anne has enjoyed her exalted title for only a short time, but already the winds of change are blowing through the court. The king is tired of her (she hasn’t produced a male heir, and her unpleasant personality is wearing thin) and finds lady-in-waiting Jane Seymour a much fresher face. Consequently, Secretary Cromwell, the king’s enforcer, steps in, drawing the battle lines between himself and Queen Anne. The conflict will be deadly and, for the reader, edge-of-the-seat gripping. Like its predecessor, this is a rigorous read. One must get used to Mantel’s intricate storytelling, and inattention will quickly derail one’s grasp of events. Mantel’s seductive, almost hypnotic, style is both formal, which is appropriate to the time, and exquisitely fluid, while beautifully articulated dialogue serves the story well, lending depth to characterizations and advancing the rich plot. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Mantel’s previous novel won the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction and appeared on best-seller lists; anticipation for the sequel is high. -- Hooper, Brad (Reviewed 06-01-2012) (Booklist, vol 108, number 19, p45)
  • When last we saw Thomas Cromwell, hero of Mantel’s 2009 Man Booker Prize–winning Wolf Hall, he’d successfully moved emperors, queens, courtiers, the pope, and Thomas More to secure a divorce and a new, younger queen for his patron, Henry the VIII. Now, in the second book of a planned trilogy, Cromwell, older, tired, with more titles and power, has to get Henry out of another heirless marriage. The historical facts are known: this is not about what happens, but about how. And armed with street smarts, vast experience and connections, a ferociously good memory, and a patient taste for revenge, Mantel’s Cromwell is a master of how. Like its predecessor, the book is written in the present tense, rare for a historical novel. But the choice makes the events unfold before us: one wrong move and all could be lost. Also repeated is Mantel’s idiosyncratic use of “he:” regardless of the rules of grammar, rest assured “he” is always Cromwell. By this second volume, however, Mantel has taught us how to read her, and seeing Cromwell manipulate and outsmart the nobles who look down on him, while moving between his well-managed domestic arrangements and the murky world of accusations and counteraccusations is pure pleasure. Cromwell may, as we learn in the first volume, look “like a murderer,” but he’s mighty good company. Agent: Bill Hamilton, A.M. Heath. (May) --Staff (Reviewed April 2, 2012) (Publishers Weekly, vol 259, issue 14, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ In her sequel to the Booker Man Prize-winning Wolf Hall , Mantel has done what only the most gifted novelist can: she has fleshed out an enigma—the historical cipher that was Thomas Cromwell, Henry VIII's fixer—and made us accept her interpretation of him as valid. Cromwell helped Henry annul his marriage to his wife of 20 years, Catherine, so he could marry the younger Anne Boleyn. But three years later, Anne has committed two fatal errors: she hasn't given the king a son, and she has become outspoken. Henry's eyes are on a younger, more placid woman, Jane Seymour. He wants to be rid of Anne, and it is up to Cromwell to see that Henry gets what he wants. VERDICT Mantel's crowning achievement makes Cromwell not just powerful but sympathetic. Mantel is a consummate setter of scenes: stunning, poetic descriptions are embedded in scenes of savagery and earthiness. The historical novel does not come any better than this. It will be as much of a success as its predecessor. [See Prepub Alert, 2/27/11.]— David Keymer, Modesto, CA --David Keymer (Reviewed June 1, 2012) (Library Journal, vol 137, issue 10, p93)
  • Second in Mantel's trilogy charting the Machiavellian trajectory of Thomas Cromwell. The Booker award-winning first volume, Wolf Hall (2009), ended before the titular residence, that of Jane Seymour's family, figured significantly in the life of King Henry VIII. Seeing through Cromwell's eyes, a point of view she has thoroughly assimilated, Mantel approaches the major events slantwise, as Cromwell, charged with the practical details of managing Henry's political and religious agendas, might have. We rejoin the characters as the king's thousand-day marriage to Anne Boleyn is well along. Princess Elizabeth is a toddler, the exiled Queen Katherine is dying, and Henry's disinherited daughter Princess Mary is under house arrest. As Master Secretary, Cromwell, while managing his own growing fortune, is always on call to put out fires at the court of the mercurial Henry (who, even for a king, is the ultimate Bad Boss). The English people, not to mention much of Europe, have never accepted Henry's second marriage as valid, and Anne's upstart relatives are annoying some of Britain's more entrenched nobility with their arrogance and preening. Anne has failed to produce a son, and despite Cromwell's efforts to warn her (the two were once allies of a sort), she refuses to alter her flamboyant behavior, even as Henry is increasingly beguiled by Jane Seymour's contrasting (some would say calculated) modesty. Cromwell, a key player in the annulment of Henry's first marriage, must now find a pretext for the dismantling of a second. Once he begins interrogating, with threats of torture, Anne's male retainers to gather evidence of her adulteries, Mantel has a difficult challenge in keeping up our sympathy for Cromwell. She succeeds, mostly by portraying Cromwell as acutely aware that one misstep could land "him, Cromwell" on the scaffold as well. That misstep will happen, but not in this book. The inventiveness of Mantel's language is the chief draw here; the plot, as such, will engage only the most determined of Tudor enthusiasts.(Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2012)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Awards note
Man Booker Prize, 2012
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10115452
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1952-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mantel, Hilary
Dewey number
823/.914
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Wolf Hall trilogy
Series volume
0002
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Cromwell, Thomas
  • Cromwell, Thomas
  • FICTION
  • FICTION
  • Great Britain
  • Great Britain
Label
Bring up the bodies : a novel, Hilary Mantel
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "A John Macrae book."
  • Sequel to: Wolf Hall
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
855830
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
xvii, 410 pages
Isbn
9780805090031
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2012006335
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780805090031
  • (OCoLC)773667451
Label
Bring up the bodies : a novel, Hilary Mantel
Publication
Note
  • "A John Macrae book."
  • Sequel to: Wolf Hall
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
855830
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
xvii, 410 pages
Isbn
9780805090031
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2012006335
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780805090031
  • (OCoLC)773667451

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
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    • Southeast BranchBorrow it
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