Coverart for item
The Resource Blue Avenue, Michael Wiley

Blue Avenue, Michael Wiley

Label
Blue Avenue
Title
Blue Avenue
Statement of responsibility
Michael Wiley
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Summoned by his old friend, homicide detective Daniel Turner, to identify the trussed-up, naked body of a woman, found wrapped in cellophane amongst a pile of garbage on Blue Avenue, a down-at-heel area of Jacksonville, Florida, businessman William Byrd or "BB" is in for a shock. He recognises the dead woman as Belinda Mabry, the girl with whom he spent an intense and passionate summer twenty-five years before. What's more, as Daniel informs him, she's the third victim to have met such a hideously gruesome end. Determined to find out what happened to Belinda Mabry and where she'd been for the past twenty-five years, BB must revisit his own troubled past - and discover more than he ever really wanted to know about the woman he once loved. But his investigations are causing serious ripples amongst prominent members of the local community. Has BB found himself on a road of no return?
Member of
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • A beautiful black woman is found dead, and William Byrd thinks he should do something about it. They were lovers once. He’s a businessman now and a family man, but the dead woman has stayed in that corner of his mind where swoony dreams live. He must learn what happened. So begins a story stuffed with stock characters that are, finally, not what they seem. Byrd starts as a Hitchcock hero, an innocent pulled into a corrupt world. His pal is another familiar figure, the rumpled homicide detective who warns the hero to stay clear. There’s even the endearingly vicious friend, like Win in Harlan Coben’s Myron Bolitar series, who does the brutal stuff the hero can’t or won’t do. Then the veil is yanked away. The dream girl was part of something bad, and the cop and the tough are maybe not the hero’s friends. And Byrd? He’d be at home in a Faulkner novel. Parts of the novel read like essays rather than narrative, too much description slowing and distracting. Still, the revelations will reward readers’ patience. -- Crinklaw, Don (Reviewed 11-01-2014) (Booklist, vol 111, number 5, p25)
  • /* Starred Review */ Noir fiction doesn’t get much darker than Wiley’s thriller introducing police detective Daniel Turner, who is largely an observer in his first outing. Disreputable Jacksonville, Fla., businessman William “BB” Byrd and his casually brutal cohort, Charles, pursue a serial killer who has just murdered Belinda Mabry, the woman who was BB’s first lover 25 years earlier. Even if it means further alienating his own precariously balanced family, BB can’t stop interrogating Jacksonville’s sleaziest pimps, prostitutes, and politicians to find out what happened to Belinda in life and death. Unpleasant secrets keep surfacing, sometimes in the investigation but also in the investigators, and Wiley (A Bad Night’s Sleep ) is extremely good at creating an atmosphere of menacing dread as BB learns more about the dead woman and himself. New shocks occur all the way to the last page—and continue as readers reflect on what they’ve just witnessed. Agent: Philip Spitzer, Philip G. Spitzer Literary Agency. (Dec.) --Staff (Reviewed October 13, 2014) (Publishers Weekly, vol 260, issue 41, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ William Byrd (BB) is a Jacksonville, FL, businessman who owns four gas stations inherited from his father. He and his wife are estranged but live together in the same house, along with their teenage son, who hates everyone and spends his time in his room drawing pornographic graphic novels. BB gets a call one morning from an old friend, Det. Daniel Turner, who asks him to identify a body found wrapped in cellophane on the rundown Blue Avenue. BB recognizes the victim as an African American girl named Belinda Mabry, with whom he was in love when he was 17. As the investigation reveals that Belinda was the victim of a serial killer, BB brings in his mysterious buddy Charles to help him find the murderer. Charles fixes what needs fixing, no matter what is involved. VERDICT The Shamus Award-winning author of the Chicago-set "Joseph Kozmarksi" series (A Bad Night's Sleep ) introduces an intriguing antihero in this excellent noir that will attract readers who appreciate the anguished protagonists of Steve Hamilton and Loren D. Estleman. --Viccy Kemp (Reviewed November 1, 2014) (Library Journal, vol 139, issue 18, p62)
  • Wiley moves south from his three tales of Chicago shamus Joe Kozmarski (A Bad Night's Sleep, 2011, etc.) to Florida, where an even less heroic sleuth faces an even seamier mystery.Twenty-five years ago, Belinda Mabry was William "BB" Byrd's first love. Now his friend Lt. Detective Daniel Turner of the Jacksonville Police wants him to identify her body. It's Belinda all right, tied neck and heels, shrouded in plastic and dumped in a pile of garbage. And she's not the only victim on Daniel's docket. Streetwalkers Tonya Richmond (black) and Ashley Littleton (white) have already been killed in much the same way. But Belinda's the one BB cares about, and soon he's ringing all the wrong doorbells, meeting all the wrong people—especially Belinda's no-good brother, Bobby, and her son, Terrence Stilman—and talking himself into a world of trouble. Luckily, he can call on tough, elderly hireling Charles Tucker whenever he needs help: "He fixed what needed fixing. He broke what needed breaking." Even though BB, unlike Belinda, is white, Wiley echoes Walter Mosley's Easy Rawlins books in both his storytelling and his first-person voice—pared down, digressive and frankly revealing. As BB works to connect the murders to the accidental death of a good-time Jamaican girl in the middle of an experiment in erotic asphyxia, the plot, fueled by a steadily rising body count, boils furiously until it reaches a climax that's both utterly predictable and powerfully unnerving. Repeated doses of strong sexual violence make this one definitely not for the kiddies. First of a series, though you have to wonder who's left in Jacksonville for the sequels.(Kirkus Reviews, November 1, 2014)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10385392
Cataloging source
UKMGB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1961-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Wiley, Michael
Dewey number
813.6
Index
no index present
Literary form
novels
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Detective Daniel Turner novels
Series volume
0001
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Police
  • Serial murder investigation
Label
Blue Avenue, Michael Wiley
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1064337
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
216 pages
Isbn
9780727884299
Isbn Type
(Hardcover)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780727884299
  • (OCoLC)881020096
Label
Blue Avenue, Michael Wiley
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1064337
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
216 pages
Isbn
9780727884299
Isbn Type
(Hardcover)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780727884299
  • (OCoLC)881020096

Library Locations

    • Little Walnut Creek BranchBorrow it
      835 W. Rundberg Lane, Austin, TX, 78758, US
      30.3632362 -97.6984619
Processing Feedback ...