Coverart for item
The Resource Beautiful birds, text by Jean Roussen ; illustrations by Emmanuelle Walker

Beautiful birds, text by Jean Roussen ; illustrations by Emmanuelle Walker

Label
Beautiful birds
Title
Beautiful birds
Statement of responsibility
text by Jean Roussen ; illustrations by Emmanuelle Walker
Creator
Contributor
Author
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"In this stunningly illustrated introduction to the world's most beautiful birds, Jean Roussen and Emmanuelle Walker pay homage to an alphabet of birds in all their feathery fancies. From Warblers to Blue-tits and Kakapos to Owls, Roussen's playful, melodic poem is complemented beautifully by Walker's delicate illustrations."
Writing style
Illustration
Review
  • Grades K-2 An alphabet book featuring birds is nothing terribly new, but Roussen and Walker’s visually thrilling avian abecedary flies higher than most. On tall pages, Walker’s graphic-design-influenced illustrations depict stylish birds, from the albatross to the “zos-ter-o-pi-dae.” Each composition is artfully arranged, from two macaws nuzzling on crisscrossed telephone wires to the xanthocephalus (“that means ‘gold-head’ in Greek”) perched atop a classical statue of a torso. Pops of fiery, fluorescent pinks zing next to crisp shapes of organic colors, a palette that gives the whole package an otherworldly quality, but each bird is rendered carefully and realistically enough that browsers should have no trouble recognizing the real thing. For all the visual finesse, however, the text doesn’t quite measure up. The rhyming lines are occasionally jolting and often don’t offer much in the way of factual information. That said, the eye candy is the real treat here. Most kids—and adults—will enjoy flipping through the vivid, beautiful pages, each of which would look at home framed on a wall. -- Hunter, Sarah (Reviewed 04-01-2015) (Booklist, vol 111, number 15)
  • Gr 1 – 4 — Organized alphabetically, these stunning illustrations of birds will inspire students of graphic design more than they convey avian information. The bright neon pink of the endpapers recurs on each spread, appearing as small details such as a kiwi's glowing eyes or as background as eagles swooping for their prey. Sharp-eyed readers will appreciate visual humor provided by touches such as the construction crane in the background of the page featuring whopping and crowned cranes or the lyrebird's tail next to the musical instrument of the same name. The brief, poetic text suffers from bumps in rhyme and rhythm, although the revelation of the peacock as the book's "guide" offers an amusing twist at the end. Small type minimizes the featured letters and not all of them represent birds, e.g., "V" is for a flight formation. Those searching for an avian-themed alphabet book incorporating large letters, clear illustrations, and brief but factual introductions should consider Jerry Pallotta's The Bird Alphabet Book (Charlesbridge, 1986). VERDICT Walker's illustrations deserve repeated viewings and can serve as a starting point for art and design projects for students in elementary school and above.—Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University Library, Mankato --Kathy Piehl (Reviewed April 1, 2015) (School Library Journal, vol 61, issue 4, p134)
  • Saying that a particular shade of pink is the star of a picture book may sound strange, but in this case, it’s true. A flash of neon vermilion jumps out from nearly every page of Walker’s crisp, silkscreen-style spreads, created to accompany Roussen’s avian abecedary, which runs from albatross (“the admiral of the skies”) to zosteropidae (“finding that bird just made my day”). All the focus is on the artwork, and the supercharged pink is often used as an accent (or an exclamation point) in Walker’s rich tapestries of the birds and their surroundings. The beaks and feet of doves, the needlelike tongue of an egret, two flamingos (of course), and an old-fashioned microphone atop which a lark perches are all jolted with shots of pink. The few spreads in which it can’t be found are unaccountably quiet by comparison. There are some inelegant moments in Roussen’s meter and rhyme, but since the artwork is doing all the heavy lifting, it’s a minor quibble. The spreads are as opulent as a peacock’s tail, and they’ll send many back for long second looks. Ages 3–7. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed February 23, 2015) (Publishers Weekly, vol 262, issue 08, p)
  • An alphabetical album of birds flies in from the U.K.From albatross to "zos-ter-o-pi-dae," the images in this slightly oversized import consistently stun with their composition and use of color. A squadron of the aforementioned albatrosses glides serenely across the page, wings outstretched at a 45-degree angle to the page edges; in between the birds, slightly smaller jets leave perfectly horizontal contrails across a pearly gray sky. On the verso of one double-page spread, a Canada goose leads a brood of gray goslings in a semicircle against a snowy backdrop; across the gutter, a domestic white goose leads squawking yellow goslings in a mirroring pattern across a sandy barnyard. A lark perches on an old-fashioned radio microphone and sings serenely in the spotlight, framed by diagonal curtains of black. Colors are matte, depending for their effectiveness on contrast and the judicious use of Day-Glo pink—an artistic choice that works with the striking compositions to create some images that reach abstraction, as in a layered congregation of cockatoo crests. The slight couplets are significantly less distinguished, often struggling for both rhyme and scansion, but they are easy to overlook as readers' eyes glide over the luscious pages. The image of a nightingale, framed in an open, circular window beneath a crescent moon, is alone worth the purchase price. With pages that beg to be sliced out and framed, a positive feast for the eyes. (Picture book. 3-8)(Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2015)
Assigning source
Publishers description
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10410492
Cataloging source
VPW
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Roussen, Jean
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 1
  • 4
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Walker, Emmanuelle
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Birds
  • Animals
  • Alphabet
  • Stories in rhyme
  • Birds
  • Alphabet
  • Animals
Target audience
primary
Label
Beautiful birds, text by Jean Roussen ; illustrations by Emmanuelle Walker
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
ocn905608566
Dimensions
32 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9781909263291
Isbn Type
(Hardcover)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)905608566
Label
Beautiful birds, text by Jean Roussen ; illustrations by Emmanuelle Walker
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
ocn905608566
Dimensions
32 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9781909263291
Isbn Type
(Hardcover)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)905608566

Library Locations

    • North Village BranchBorrow it
      2505 Steck Ave, Austin, TX, 78757, US
      30.362144 -97.7305032
    • St. John BranchBorrow it
      7500 Blessing Ave., Austin, TX, 78752, US
      30.3328231 -97.6937014
    • Spicewood Springs BranchBorrow it
      8637 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin, TX, 78759, US
      30.4337083 -97.7730809
Processing Feedback ...