Coverart for item
The Resource Baba Yaga's assistant, Marika McCoola ; illustrated by Emily Carroll

Baba Yaga's assistant, Marika McCoola ; illustrated by Emily Carroll

Label
Baba Yaga's assistant
Title
Baba Yaga's assistant
Statement of responsibility
Marika McCoola ; illustrated by Emily Carroll
Title variation
Baba Yagas assistant
Creator
Contributor
Author
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Most children think twice before braving a haunted wood filled with terrifying beasties to match wits with a witch, but not Masha. Her beloved grandma taught her many things: that stories are useful, that magic is fickle, that nothing is too difficult or too dirty to clean. The fearsome witch of folklore needs an assistant, and Masha needs an adventure. She may be clever enough to enter Baba Yaga's house-on-chicken-legs, but within its walls, deceit is the rule. To earn her place, Masha must pass a series of tests, outfox a territorial bear, and make dinner for her host. No easy task, with children on the menu!" --
Tone
Writing style
Illustration
Award
  • ALA Notable Children's Book, 2016
  • YALSA Great Graphic Novels for Teens, 2016.
Review
  • Grades 5-8 Masha was raised by her grandmother, who regaled her with wry stories about outwitting Baba Yaga, but now her grandmother’s dead, her insensitive father is getting remarried, and Masha doesn’t feel welcome at home anymore. Luckily, she spots Baba Yaga’s newspaper ad for an assistant, so she packs up a few enchanted items and sets off to find the witch. Recalling Baba Yaga stories as well as her grandmother’s kindness, lonesome Masha cleverly tackles the witch’s assignments. But are her wiles—not to mention her sneaky, innate magical talents—enough to satisfy Baba Yaga’s demands? Carroll’s dark yet luminous artwork is a perfect match for McCoola’s tale, particularly when she illustrates the classic Baba Yaga stories interspersed throughout, which appear in blockier, simplified figures framed by charming folk-art-style designs. Meanwhile, Masha’s story is full of eerie shading and delicate detail. Witches are certainly spooky fare, but this Baba Yaga appreciates cunningly creative thinking, and, as Masha discovers, she’s surprisingly warmhearted. A perfect match for Deb Lucke’s The Lunch Witch (2015). -- Hunter, Sarah (Reviewed 06-01-2015) (Booklist, vol 111, number 19, p67)
  • Gr 4 – 7 — Masha is less than thrilled when her widower father announces he is going to remarry. The last thing she wants is a stepmother and stepsister. All she can think of are the tales her grandmother would tell her, filled with evil stepmothers and the terrible trickster Baba Yaga. With emotions running high and feeling unwanted by her father, Masha decides to respond to the following ad: "ASSISTANT WANTED ASAP: Must have skills in hauling, obeying orders, cooking and cleaning. Magical talent a bonus. Must be good with heights. Enter Baba Yaga's house to apply." Not knowing what to expect, but feeling that nothing can be as bad as her situation at home, she heads into the forest. The events that follow help Masha find the strength to survive and endure Baba Yaga's tests and the courage to face what is waiting back home for her. Upper elementary readers will enjoy how the illustrations create a moody and mysterious creepiness surrounding Baba Yaga. The characters are expressively drawn, adding drama to the story. Masha's tween angst will resonate as she copes with her new family situation. VERDICT This title will find a home with fans of R.L. Stine's "Goosebumps" (Scholastic) and Luke Pearson's "Hilda" graphic novel series (Nobrow).—Carol Hirsche, Provo City Library, UT --Carol Hirsche (Reviewed August 1, 2015) (School Library Journal, vol 61, issue 8, p95)
  • Masha has lost her grandmother, who loved and nurtured Masha after her mother’s death. Her stories led Masha to believe that her grandmother had known the fairy tale witch Baba Yaga personally. So when Masha sees a newspaper ad asking for an assistant (“enter Baba Yaga’s house to apply”), she strikes out for the famous chicken-legged dwelling. The trials that Baba Yaga challenges Masha with allow her to work through some dark memories and offer a chance to resolve present-day problems, too, including the loss of her father’s attention to a new fiancée. Though newcomer McCoola’s dialogue wobbles a bit early on (“I’m tired of being overlooked. I need to do something useful for someone”), it tightens up quickly as Masha battles a bear, bathes a closetful of snakes, and sweet-talks Baba Yaga’s house into letting her enter (“I think the porch and stairs add grace to your proportions”). Carroll’s (Through the Woods ) spidery, delicate drawings convey deliciously understated creepiness. Strong, complex characters and the inventive fusion of contemporary and fairy tale elements make this a noteworthy collaboration. Ages 10–up. Agent: Jen Linnan, Linnan Literary Management. (Aug.) --Staff (Reviewed May 25, 2015) (Publishers Weekly, vol 262, issue 21, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ After her long-distant father remarries, a young woman leaves home to be the assistant to the famous witch Baba Yaga in this clever reinvention. After her mother's death, Masha resides with her father, who keeps his distance from her both physically and emotionally. She is raised by her loving grandmother, who tells her all about her experiences with the cunning old crone Baba Yaga and the schemes she used to trick the aged witch. In a swift turn of events, her grandmother dies, and Masha's father remarries. Her new stepmother is aloof and has her own young daughter, Dani, a horrid, hand-biting brat. In a moment of desperation, Masha decides to follow in her grandmother's footsteps and answers an advertisement to be Baba Yaga's assistant. Once installed in the chicken-legged hut, she learns of the three purposefully tricky tests she must complete. McCoola's offering is a well-nuanced delight, satisfyingly blending fairy tale, legend, and thrills. As a perfect complement, Carroll's evocative art enthralls, capturing both the emotion and the magic of McCoola's yarn and breathing new life into an old folk tale. Though structured like a fairy tale, this clever and well-appointed graphic novel is refreshingly modern and obviously enjoys playing with conventions. A magnificently magical must-read for all fairy-tale fans. (Graphic fantasy. 9-14)(Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 2015)
Assigning source
provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10435435
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McCoola, Marika
Dewey number
741.5973
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • GN340L
  • Decoding demand: 84 (very high)
  • Semantic demand: 95 (very high)
  • Syntactic demand: 54 (medium)
  • Structure demand: 86 (very high)
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Interest level
MG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 4
  • 7
Nature of contents
comics graphic novels
Reading level
2.8
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Carroll, Emily
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Baba Yaga
  • Teenage girls
  • Witches
  • Comic books, strips, etc.
  • Baba Yaga
  • Teenage girls
  • Witches
  • Baba Yaga
  • Teenage girls
  • Witches
  • Cartoons and comics
Target audience
juvenile
Label
Baba Yaga's assistant, Marika McCoola ; illustrated by Emily Carroll
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
1100311
Dimensions
cm
Extent
pages
Isbn
9780763669614
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780763669614
  • (OCoLC)900179990
Label
Baba Yaga's assistant, Marika McCoola ; illustrated by Emily Carroll
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
1100311
Dimensions
cm
Extent
pages
Isbn
9780763669614
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780763669614
  • (OCoLC)900179990

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Manchaca Road BranchBorrow it
      5500 Manchaca Road, Austin, TX, 78745, US
      30.2166039 -97.79733689999999
    • North Village BranchBorrow it
      2505 Steck Ave, Austin, TX, 78757, US
      30.362144 -97.7305032
    • Ruiz BranchBorrow it
      1600 Grove Blvd., Austin, TX, 78741, US
      30.2298616 -97.7070109
    • Twin Oaks BranchBorrow it
      1800 S. Fifth St., Austin, TX, 78704, US
      30.2486884 -97.76239749999999
    • University Hills BranchBorrow it
      4701 Loyola Ln., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.3093017 -97.6664785
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