The Resource At the river I stand

At the river I stand

Label
At the river I stand
Title
At the river I stand
Contributor
Producer
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
At the river I stand: the 1968 Memphis sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Memphis, Spring 1968 marked the dramatic climax of the Civil Rights movement. At the River I Stand skillfully reconstructs the two eventful months that transformed a strike by Memphis sanitation worker into a national conflagration, and disentangles the complex historical forces that came together with the inevitability of tragedy at the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This 58-minute documentary brings into sharp relief issues that have only become more urgent in the intervening years: the connection between economic and civil rights, debates over strategies for change, the demand for full inclusion of African Americans in American life and the fight for dignity for public employees and all working people. In the 1960s, Memphis' 1,300 sanitation workers formed the lowest caste of a deeply racist society, earning so little they qualified for welfare. In the film, retired workers recall their fear about taking on the entire white power structure when they struck for higher wages and union recognition. But local civil rights leaders and the Black community soon realized the strike was part of the struggle for economic justice for all African Americans. Through stirring historical footage we see the community mobilizing behind the strikers, organizing mass demonstrations and an Easter boycott of downtown businesses. The national leadership of AFSCME put the international union's full resources behind the strike. One day, a placard appeared on the picket lines which in its radical simplicity summed up the meaning of the strike: "I am a man." In March, Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Memphis as part of his Poor People's Campaign to expand the civil rights agenda to the economy. The film recreates the controversies between King's advisors, local leaders, and younger militants - debates that led to open conflict. When young hotheads turned King's protest march into a violent confrontation with the brutal Memphis policy, King left. King and the nation realized his leadership and nonviolent strategy had been threatened. King felt obliged to return to Memphis to resume a nonviolent march despite the by-now feverish racial tensions. The film captures the deep sense of foreboding that pervaded King's final "I have been to the mountaintop" speech. The next day, April 4, 1968, he was assassinated. Four days later, thousands from Memphis and around the country rallied to pull off King's nonviolent march. The city council crumbled and granted most of the strikers' demands. Those 1,300 sanitation workers had shown they could successfully challenge the entrenched economic structure of the South. Endemic inner-city poverty, attempts to roll back gains won by public employees, and the growing gap between the rich and the rest of us make clear that the issues Martin Luther King, Jr. raised in his last days have yet to be addressed. At the River I Stand succeeds in showing that the causes of (and possibly the solutions to) our present racial quandary may well be found in what happened in Memphis. Its riveting portrait of the grit and determination of ordinary people will inspire viewers to re-dedicate themselves to racial and economic justice. Producer David Appleby began making and producing documentaries 30 years ago with his first film, Remains (1979). His independent and collaborative film work has earned him a Peabody Award, a duPont-Columbia Award, three CINE Golden Eagle awards, as well as a regional Emmy and a national Emmy nomination. He is currently a professor at the University of Memphis. Other titles by the producer: Hoxie: The first stand a professor of media studies in the Department of Communication at The University of Memphis, Allison Graham currently researches and teaches American culture, and media. Her work spans documentary film production, journalism, and scholarly publication, for which she has received several national awards, international and national grants, and an Emmy nomination. Steven Ross writes, produces, and directs documentary and fiction films. He is currently a Communications professor at the University of Memphis. His films have been broadcasted on PBS, the Arts and Entertainment Network, and have been screened at several international film festivals
Cataloging source
UtOrBLW
Characteristic
videorecording
Date time place
Originally produced by California Newsreel in 1993
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Appleby, David
  • Kanopy (Firm)
Runtime
58
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • King, Martin Luther
  • AFSCME
  • Sanitation Workers Strike, Memphis, Tenn., 1968
  • Assassination
  • Employees
  • Documentary films
Technique
live action
Label
At the river I stand
Link
http://austinpl.kanopystreaming.com/node/62800
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Title from title frames
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Configuration of playback channels
unknown
Content category
two-dimensional moving image
Content type code
tdi
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
kan1062799
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 56 min.)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Medium for sound
other
Other physical details
digital, .flv file, sound
Publisher number
1062799
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
sound
Sound on medium or separate
sound on medium
Specific material designation
  • other
  • remote
System control number
(OCoLC)897768016
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Video recording format
other
Label
At the river I stand
Link
http://austinpl.kanopystreaming.com/node/62800
Publication
Note
Title from title frames
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Configuration of playback channels
unknown
Content category
two-dimensional moving image
Content type code
tdi
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
kan1062799
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 56 min.)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Medium for sound
other
Other physical details
digital, .flv file, sound
Publisher number
1062799
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
sound
Sound on medium or separate
sound on medium
Specific material designation
  • other
  • remote
System control number
(OCoLC)897768016
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Video recording format
other

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