Coverart for item
The Resource Arguing about slavery : the great battle in the United States Congress, William Lee Miller

Arguing about slavery : the great battle in the United States Congress, William Lee Miller

Label
Arguing about slavery : the great battle in the United States Congress
Title
Arguing about slavery
Title remainder
the great battle in the United States Congress
Statement of responsibility
William Lee Miller
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Here is the United States Congress in the 1830s, grappling (or trying unsuccessfully to avoid grappling) with the gravest moral dilemma inherited from the framers of the Constitution. Here is the concept (and reality) of the ownership of human beings confronting three of the most powerful ideas of the time: American republicanism, American civil liberties, American representative government. This book re-creates an episode in our past, now forgotten, that once stirred and engrossed the nation: the congressional fight over petitions against slavery. The action takes place in the House of Representatives. Beginning in 1835, a new flood of abolitionist petitions pours into the House. The powers-that-be respond with a gag rule as their means of keeping these appeals off the House floor and excluding them from national discussion. A small band of congressmen, led by former president John Quincy Adams, battles against successive versions of the gag and introduces petitions in spite of it. Then, in February 1837, Adams raises the stakes by forcing the House to cope with what he calls "The Most Important Question to come before this House since its first origin": Do slaves have the right of petition? When the Whigs take over in 1841, some expect the gag rule to be repudiated, but instead it is made permanent. A small insurgent group of Whigs, collaborating with Adams, opposes party policy and makes opposition to slavery their top priority. They constitute the seedbed for the formation of the Republican Party which will be, in the next decade, the beginning of the end of slavery. Congressional leaders try to censure Adams, and his well-publicized "trial" in the House brings the entire matter to the nation's attention. The anti-Adams effort fails, and finally, after nine years of persistent support of the right of petition, Adams succeeds in defeating the gag rule. Throughout, one can see the gradual assembling not only of the political but also of the moral and intellectual elements for the ultimate assault on American slavery. When John Quincy Adams dies, virtually on the House floor, the young congressman Abraham Lincoln is sitting in the chamber
Summary
Describes the 1830s battle over slavery in the Congress, led by John Quincy Adams and other prominent abolitionists
Award
Booklist Editors' Choice, 1996.
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
162279
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Miller, William Lee
Dewey number
973.5
Index
index present
LC call number
E338
LC item number
.M65 1996
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • Adams, John Quincy
  • Adams, John Quincy
  • United States
  • United States
  • Slavery
  • Politics and government
  • Slavery
  • United States
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the great battle in the United States Congress
Label
Arguing about slavery : the great battle in the United States Congress, William Lee Miller
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 545-553) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introductions -- Immediate representatives -- The fiends and their work -- Shut the door in their face -- The first son of the Republic -- The tedium and sublimity of Republican government -- The most important question ever to come before the house -- Welcome to the Twenty-Fifth Congress of the United States -- The great moral monument -- The tribulation of the whigs -- The trials -- Endings -- Epilogues
Control code
ocm32893199
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
x, 577 pages
Isbn
9780394569222
Lccn
95035075
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)32893199
Label
Arguing about slavery : the great battle in the United States Congress, William Lee Miller
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 545-553) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introductions -- Immediate representatives -- The fiends and their work -- Shut the door in their face -- The first son of the Republic -- The tedium and sublimity of Republican government -- The most important question ever to come before the house -- Welcome to the Twenty-Fifth Congress of the United States -- The great moral monument -- The tribulation of the whigs -- The trials -- Endings -- Epilogues
Control code
ocm32893199
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
x, 577 pages
Isbn
9780394569222
Lccn
95035075
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)32893199

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Cepeda BranchBorrow it
      651 N. Pleasant Valley Rd., Austin, TX, 78702, US
      30.2590471 -97.7088905
Processing Feedback ...