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The Resource Animal husbandry, Laura Zigman

Animal husbandry, Laura Zigman

Label
Animal husbandry
Title
Animal husbandry
Statement of responsibility
Laura Zigman
Title variation
Someone like you
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Zigman, a former book publicist, is getting a certain amount of prepublication buzz for this amusing first novel. A talent booker for a TV talk show, Jane falls head over heels for a preppy colleague. Within a few short weeks, he has talked her into moving in with him. Just as she is about to start packing, he starts giving her the cold shoulder. She is forced to move in with a decadent, womanizing coworker, and he provides her with primary-source material for her pseudo-scientific research on the mysterious behavior of the male animal. Coming up with ever more elaborate theories to explain her devastating breakup, Jane succeeds in distracting herself as she tries to mend her broken heart. Zigman's animal metaphors are funny at first but prove to be tiresome over the course of the novel; however, those who like urban tales of romantic woe will find this a satisfying read, for it has a snappy pace and some interesting characters. ((Reviewed November 15, 1997)) -- Joanne Wilkinson
  • The war between the sexes gets a fresh interpretation in Zigman's witty and entertaining first novel. Her conceit--using the mating habits of the animal kingdom to explain male courting behavior and female responses--makes for rollicking fun. Even if it flags somewhat in the novel's last third, her story of a woman ardently pursued and wooed, then unceremoniously dumped, carries emotional clout. Narrator Jane Goodall ("not the Jane Goodall") is a resourceful talent booker for a TV talk show. When Ray Brown, the program's sexy and appealingly needy executive producer, captivates Jane with a whirlwind courtship, she can't believe her happiness. Then he abruptly drops her cold. Stunned by pain and disbelief, Jane has a sudden insight that she calls "The Old-Cow-New-Cow" theory. Ray's caddish behavior, she feels, comes from the same natural source that makes bulls refuse to mate with the same cow twice. Now homeless because she had given up her apartment to move into a new place with Ray, Jane becomes obsessed with assembling more scientific facts that can explain the fecklessness of men, including her new roommate, lothario Eddie Alden. Zigman's triumph here is to invest the old story of a woman scorned with fresh contemporary relevance, while also conveying the universal poignancy of heartbreak. Her portrayal of single Manhattanites, male and female, is right on the mark, as her eye ranges over everything from their office etiquette to their after-hours amusements, cultural icons, verbal tics and dress-down clothes. The narrative loses credibility toward the end when Jane adopts a transparent pseudonym to write articles for a men's magazine, after which she is shattered by a surprise that readers will have guessed early on. Still, in her ability to evoke the emotions of a woman in the throes of passionate love, followed by abject despair, succeeded by a fierce desire for revenge, Zigman will touch a responsive chord. BOMC and PBC selections; audio to Audio Renaissance; author tour; foreign rights sold in 13 countries; film rights to Fox 2000, Linda Obst producer. (Jan.) FYI: Zigman is a publishing insider, having worked in the promotions departments at Turtle Bay Press and Knopf .
  • Jane Goodall, not the anthropologist, but rather a bright, thirtysomething Manhattan talk-show producer who is no novice to romance, staggers under the weight of being cruelly, inexplicably dumped by Ray, the man of her dreams. Nearly paralyzed by this betrayal, she becomes a self-appointed amateur scientist, studying the mating habits of the animal kingdom to make sense of her senseless human world. Jane's best friends, magazine executive Joan and David, a gay freelance fashion photographer, commiserate, having been dumped by any number of perfect men themselves. Jane's hilarious, poignant observations lead her to her New Cow/Old Cow theory as observed in the bovine population--as soon as a fledgling love interest (New Cow) becomes a familiar and known quantity, she is relegated to Old Cow status, and the hunt is on for fresh bait. Jane is able to parlay her wildlife studies into a hugely successful (if short-lived) magazine column. Readers will find themselves racing through this novel for each insight and may well close the cover, sighing in relief, "Whew, it's not just me." Highly recommended. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 9/15/97.]--Beth E. Andersen, Ann Arbor Dist. Lib., Mich.
  • /* Starred Review */ The old "let's just be friends" routine breaks a TV talk-show talent scout's heart, but when opportunity knocks, she recovers enough to assume the infinitely more satisfying role of masked avenger: a wisecracking and wonderful romantic comedy, a first from ex-New York book publicist Zigman. With a name like Jane Goodall, interest in animal behavior might seem preordained, but this Jane's life is taken up entirely with booking A-list guests for the hot, new late-night show on public television. Taken up, that is, until the show's producer comes along, with his washboard stomach and tales of woe about his man-hating vegetarian fiancâe--and until Jane finds herself hopelessly in love. For a while the attraction seems mutual, but soon after suggesting to Jane that they live together, and just after she's given up her apartment, Washboard Ray goes to ground, and nothing she can do will flush him back into communication with her. The despair of the jilted casts its usual pall over her life, but her new living arrangement, a share with the show's leading Lothario, awakens her scientific curiosity, and she begins to study the behavior of her apartment-mate with an eye toward understanding male-mating imperatives. Voracious reading and lonely hours pondering give her the answer, the New-Cow theory: A bull mates eagerly with a new cow, but then refuses to do so the second time around--only a new cow will do. Jane deepens her investigation in the spirit of pure empiricism, but when there's a chance to go public, very public, with her findings, washboard memories and a crusader's zeal fire her up with spectacular results. Zinging alone with deadeye depictions of men on the make as accurate as smart bombs, this is a riot to read--and also happens to make a great deal of sense. (Kirkus Reviews, December 15, 1997)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
064076
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Zigman, Laura
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Television producers and directors
  • Attachment behavior
  • Experiential research
Label
Animal husbandry, Laura Zigman
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
307620
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
304 pages
Isbn
9780385319003
Lccn
97034551
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780385319003
  • (Sirsi) ABO-6809
Label
Animal husbandry, Laura Zigman
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
307620
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
304 pages
Isbn
9780385319003
Lccn
97034551
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780385319003
  • (Sirsi) ABO-6809

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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