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The Resource Anatomy of innocence : testimonies of the wrongfully convicted, edited by Laura Caldwell and Leslie S. Klinger ; introduction by Scott Turow and Barry Scheck

Anatomy of innocence : testimonies of the wrongfully convicted, edited by Laura Caldwell and Leslie S. Klinger ; introduction by Scott Turow and Barry Scheck

Label
Anatomy of innocence : testimonies of the wrongfully convicted
Title
Anatomy of innocence
Title remainder
testimonies of the wrongfully convicted
Statement of responsibility
edited by Laura Caldwell and Leslie S. Klinger ; introduction by Scott Turow and Barry Scheck
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
How do wrongful convictions happen, and what are the consequences for the lucky few who are acquitted, years after they are proven innocent? Fourteen exonerated inmates narrate their stories, while another exoneree's case is explored. They detail every aspect of the experience of wrongful conviction, as well as the remarkable depths of endurance sustained by each exoneree who never lost hope
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • A collection of first-person accounts from individuals who were wrongfully arrested and convicted. Told to mystery and true crime writers such as Lee Child, Sara Paretsky, and Jan Burke, these stories highlight the defects in the police, investigative, and legal system that lead to the prosecution and incarceration of innocent people. Themes such as false confessions, mishandled evidence, and, in highly publicized cases, the desire to quickly finger a suspect rather than find the actual criminal run through the work. Each chapter describes a case (for instance, in 1973, Peter Reilly was arrested for allegedly killing his mother), explains how the individual was exonerated, provides background on the author, and features an editors' note with statistics on false convictions. The brutal reality of police torture and prison life is addressed matter-of-factly. Information on the Innocence Project and member groups by state is appended. Black-and-white photographs of the people profiled are included, along with an update on their lives since exoneration. VERDICT A valuable resource for students interested in the legal system and social justice.—Tamara Saarinen, Pierce County Library, WA --Tamara Saarinen (Reviewed 06/01/2017) (School Library Journal, vol 63, issue 6, p117)
  • Caldwell and Klinger collect 15 “Kafkaesque” stories from exonerated convicts, as told to popular writers of mystery and crime fiction. Sara Paretsky narrates the chilling ordeal of a man threatened and tortured by Chicago PD into a false confession and incarcerated for 11 years. Laurie R. King provides the account of an Army veteran who was convicted of raping a child after being misidentified by witnesses and police operating under the influence of racial bias. In a previously unpublished essay, Arthur Miller argues against capital punishment, using the example of a teenager wrongfully convicted of murdering his mother. The exonerees report PTSD, humiliation, suicidal ideation, and “soul-crushing monotony” while in prison. For one individual who served 25 years, it didn’t end there, as he was forced to register as a sex offender, wear an ankle monitor, and avoid children before his exoneration. Each chapter is introduced with a brief synopsis of what went wrong and ends with an editors’ note containing facts and figures related to issues like prison overcrowding, DNA testing, the evolution of forensic science, and the scourge of inadequate legal counsel. With these stories, the authors and editors provide a list of symptoms for an illness that is plaguing the justice system, bringing desperately needed awareness to the issues involved in wrongful convictions. (Mar.) --Staff (Reviewed 01/16/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 03, p)
  • The Innocence Project has become very influential in freeing wrongfully convicted persons using DNA testing and other legal tools. This book describes the organization's work as exemplified in 15 case studies of actual exonerations written by best-selling authors. Editors Caldwell (director, Life After Innocence, Loyola Univ. Chicago; Long Way Home) and Klinger (editor, The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes) commissioned original work from authors including Sara Paretsky and Arthur Miller. The narratives are brief but gripping, addressing common themes regarding unsubstantiated arrest, official misconduct, prison horrors, and postrelease shocks. Chapters conclude with notes providing informative context and statistics drawn from the National Registry of Exonerations and other government and research sources. A spirit of advocacy pervades the work, which ends with a listing of national and international organizations affiliated with the Innocence Project. This volume complements Damien Echols's Life After Death, a more personal story of wrongful conviction. VERDICT This anthology of short true crime stories provides a unique perspective on the flaws of the U.S. criminal justice system and its forgotten victims. It will appeal to serious true crime readers and others interested in a richer understanding of the subject. [See Prepub Alert, 8/26/16.]—Antoinette Brinkman, formerly with Southwest Indiana Mental Health Ctr. Lib., Evansville --Antoinette Brinkman (Reviewed 03/01/2017) (Library Journal, vol 142, issue 04, p94)
  • /* Starred Review */ A unique collection of 15 wrongful conviction sagas bound to shake faith in the American criminal justice system.In the past three decades, books about wrongful convictions have become so numerous that they form their own genre. The advent of DNA testing for law enforcement purposes validated the previously discredited statement that American prisons are filled with innocent inmates while the actual perpetrators remain unpunished. Few of the books, however, match this skillful anthology, assembled by Life After Innocence founder Caldwell (The Dog Park, 2014, etc.) and Edgar Award-winning mystery editor Klinger (editor: In the Shadow of Edgar Allan Poe: Classic Tales of Horror, 1816-1914, 2015, etc.), in which exonerated individuals tell their stories to high-profile authors, most of them known for their fast-paced crime novels. While the names of the exonerees may be unfamiliar to general readers, the names of the authors are better known: Sara Paretsky, Lee Child, Laurie King, and more. Scott Turow and Barry Scheck provide the introduction. Each of the 15 chapters is worthy. Perhaps the chapter combining the highest level of storytelling with the most gut-wrenching detail is Brad Parks' account of Illinois exoneree Michael Evans, wrongfully convicted of the sexual assault and murder of a 9-year-old girl; he served 26 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit. Each chapter focuses on a specific aspect involved in these wrongful convictions. Parks' account focuses on the jurors who reached the wrong decision, including the chairwoman of the jury, who felt all along that Evans was innocent. Other chapters emphasize dirty cops, craven prosecutors, flawed forensic evidence, mistaken eyewitness testimony, lying jailhouse snitches, noncompassionate judges, and more. One across-the-board theme is the hell of serving prison time while innocent, with seemingly no way out. A searing, unforgettable anthology, with valuable insights provided at the end of each chapter by the editors.(Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2016)
http://bibfra.me/vocab/relation/authorofintroduction
  • iki-O5BFXXY
  • 1v3To1kQ_9o
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10554510
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
364.973
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Caldwell, Laura
  • Klinger, Leslie S.
  • Turow, Scott
  • Scheck, Barry
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Criminal justice, Administration of
  • Judicial error
  • Prisoners
  • Prisoners
  • TRUE CRIME
  • Criminal justice, Administration of
  • Judicial error
  • Prisoners
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
testimonies of the wrongfully convicted
Label
Anatomy of innocence : testimonies of the wrongfully convicted, edited by Laura Caldwell and Leslie S. Klinger ; introduction by Scott Turow and Barry Scheck
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Descent: entering prison
  • Ken Wyniemko (Michigan exoneree), as told to Michael Harvey
  • The fortune cookie: the lessons learned
  • Kirk Bloodsworth (Maryland exoneree), as told to Lee Child
  • A study in Sisyphus: serving time
  • Audrey Edmunds (Wisconsin exoneree), as told to Judge John Sheldon and Gayle Lynds
  • The wrong man: the cruelties of fate
  • Alton Logan (Illinois exoneree), as told to Jan Burke
  • Luck and the death penalty: community involvement
  • an essay about Peter Reilly (Connecticut exoneree) by Arthur Miller
  • The knock on the door: the arrest
  • Staying on track: surviving incarceration
  • Ginny Lefever (Ohio exoneree), as told to Sarah Weinman
  • The bloody yellow shirt: obtaining help
  • William Dillon (Florida exoneree), as told to Phillip M. Margolin
  • The long wait: legal appeals
  • Jeff Deskovic (New York exoneree), as told to Gary Phillips
  • The last bad morning: exoneration
  • Antione Day (Illinois exoneree), as told to Jamie Freveletti
  • Moving forward: post release
  • Jerry Miller (Illinois exoneree), as told to John Mankiewicz
  • Gloria Killian (California exoneree), as told to S.J. Rozan
  • Every day is a new beginning: life after innocence
  • Juan Rivera (Illinois exoneree), as told to Laura Caldwell
  • The trip to Doty Road: the interrogation
  • David Bates (Illinois exoneree), as told to Sara Paretsky
  • The evidence closes in: the trial
  • Ray Towler (Ohio exoneree), as told to Laurie R. King
  • Just one: the verdict
  • Michael Evans (Illinois exoneree), as told to Brad Parks
Control code
1817396
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxxii, 260 pages
Isbn
9781631490880
Lccn
2016052528
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781631490880
  • (OCoLC)974034945
Label
Anatomy of innocence : testimonies of the wrongfully convicted, edited by Laura Caldwell and Leslie S. Klinger ; introduction by Scott Turow and Barry Scheck
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Descent: entering prison
  • Ken Wyniemko (Michigan exoneree), as told to Michael Harvey
  • The fortune cookie: the lessons learned
  • Kirk Bloodsworth (Maryland exoneree), as told to Lee Child
  • A study in Sisyphus: serving time
  • Audrey Edmunds (Wisconsin exoneree), as told to Judge John Sheldon and Gayle Lynds
  • The wrong man: the cruelties of fate
  • Alton Logan (Illinois exoneree), as told to Jan Burke
  • Luck and the death penalty: community involvement
  • an essay about Peter Reilly (Connecticut exoneree) by Arthur Miller
  • The knock on the door: the arrest
  • Staying on track: surviving incarceration
  • Ginny Lefever (Ohio exoneree), as told to Sarah Weinman
  • The bloody yellow shirt: obtaining help
  • William Dillon (Florida exoneree), as told to Phillip M. Margolin
  • The long wait: legal appeals
  • Jeff Deskovic (New York exoneree), as told to Gary Phillips
  • The last bad morning: exoneration
  • Antione Day (Illinois exoneree), as told to Jamie Freveletti
  • Moving forward: post release
  • Jerry Miller (Illinois exoneree), as told to John Mankiewicz
  • Gloria Killian (California exoneree), as told to S.J. Rozan
  • Every day is a new beginning: life after innocence
  • Juan Rivera (Illinois exoneree), as told to Laura Caldwell
  • The trip to Doty Road: the interrogation
  • David Bates (Illinois exoneree), as told to Sara Paretsky
  • The evidence closes in: the trial
  • Ray Towler (Ohio exoneree), as told to Laurie R. King
  • Just one: the verdict
  • Michael Evans (Illinois exoneree), as told to Brad Parks
Control code
1817396
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxxii, 260 pages
Isbn
9781631490880
Lccn
2016052528
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781631490880
  • (OCoLC)974034945

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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