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The Resource An empire of wealth : the epic history of American economic power, John Steele Gordon

An empire of wealth : the epic history of American economic power, John Steele Gordon

Label
An empire of wealth : the epic history of American economic power
Title
An empire of wealth
Title remainder
the epic history of American economic power
Statement of responsibility
John Steele Gordon
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Writing style
Review
  • The word "epic" in the subtitle is a tip-off that instead of a critical history of the American economy, this book is a celebration of it. Nothing wrong with that, especially when the tale's told breezily and accurately. In fact, Gordon (The Scarlet Woman of Wall Street ) notes the many stumbles and the frequent foolishness and corruption that attended the nation's rise as an economic powerhouse. The larger story of success is, in fact, an extraordinary one. The trouble is that the American economy, like every other, bends much out of shape. It has always provided opportunity but always with too much inequality. A full history of the American economy would take this into consideration—in the past as well as the present, and Gordon's doesn't. Also, his book sometimes wanders off into irrelevant subjects, like the origins of the computer, but his grasp of the larger picture is sure and his prose bright. His chapter on Northern and Southern Civil War finances is a model of its kind. Those seeking an introduction to the general history of American economic power will find few better places to start, as long as they keep in mind that the nation's economy is not perfect, its benefits not unalloyed and its future domination of other economic powerhouses by no means assured. Agent, Katinka Matson. (Oct. 5) --Staff (Reviewed August 2, 2004) (Publishers Weekly, vol 251, issue 31, p59)
  • Gordon, a contributing editor forAmerican Heritage often heard on public radio'sMarketplace,has managed to write an engrossing and comprehensive survey of U.S. economic activity from Colonial times through the fall of communism and the S&L crisis.He presents even the least vivid economic history, such as the late 19th-century debate over the gold standard, in a fascinating manner. Devoting commensuratespace to each period, he ably presents the panoply of American economics throughwars, technical innovations, financial booms and busts, social changes, and government regulation. His judgments are balanced and less polemical than Thomas J.DiLorenzo's in the recentHow Capitalism Saved America, though like DiLorenzo he does do some anti-capitalism myth busting. He portrays 19th-century "robber barons" in generally positive terms, and whilehe praises Franklin Roosevelt for restoring American confidence after the GreatDepression, he also argues that most of the New Deal programs were unsuccessfuland economically shortsighted. This remarkably detailed and interesting book ishighly recommended for both academic and public libraries.—Lawrence R. Maxted, Gannon Univ., Erie, PA Library Journal, A Reed Business Information Publication
  • Forget about life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness: American history is all about the Benjamins.America's present poised-for-empire stance is the logical consequence of American supremacy in the marketplace, writes financial historian Gordon (A Thread Across the Ocean, 2002, etc.). It's not only that the present economy is so vast and so varied, but also that "virtually every major development in technology in the 20th century—which was far and away the most important century in the history of technology—originated in the US or was principally industrialized and turned into consumer products here." It has not always been so, Gordon goes on to report. But he makes it clear that the European presence on the North American continent, in a variety of successive regimes, has always involved finance somewhere in the equation; as Gordon notes, Columbus's expedition included an accountant, the Jamestown settlement was a corporate venture, the founding of the Carolinas was a result of an overcrowded sugarcane industry in the Caribbean, and so forth. Some of what Gordon writes about is not news, but he brings considerable nuance to bear on his interpretations of our history: Massachusetts was able to take the world lead in shipbuilding, he writes by way of example, because, although its labor costs were very high, its material costs were so low that "New England could build a ship for about half the cost of building one in England," and this helped build an American economy that would soon become self-sufficient—one more reason not to be governed from abroad. Gordon's narrative is full of rich data on such matters as the growth of the transcontinental railroads, the origin of income and other common taxes, the abandonment of the gold standard, the rise of the consumer economy, and—most interesting of all—economic misjudgments and their reverberations throughout history.Solid raw material with plenty of value added. Just the thing for economics wonks, then, but lively enough to make for good airplane reading. (Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2004)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
220355
Cataloging source
PXO
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Gordon, John Steele
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the epic history of American economic power
Label
An empire of wealth : the epic history of American economic power, John Steele Gordon
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [433]-441) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
490440
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xviii, 460 pages
Isbn
9780060093624
Lccn
2004275639
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780060093624
  • (Sirsi) ADO-9154
Label
An empire of wealth : the epic history of American economic power, John Steele Gordon
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [433]-441) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
490440
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xviii, 460 pages
Isbn
9780060093624
Lccn
2004275639
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780060093624
  • (Sirsi) ADO-9154

Library Locations

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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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