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The Resource After the snow, S.D. Crockett

After the snow, S.D. Crockett

Label
After the snow
Title
After the snow
Statement of responsibility
S.D. Crockett
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Fifteen-year-old Willo Blake, born after the 2059 snows that ushered in a new ice age, encounters outlaws, halfmen, and an abandoned girl as he journeys in search of his family, who mysteriously disappeared from the freezing mountain that was their home
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Grades 8-12 People barely remember the time before the new Ice Age. Now, punishing snow is a year-round occurrence, and 15-year-old Willo and his family scrape out a living in the wilderness, trapping animals for skins that they can then sell to what remains of the government. One day Willo’s family vanishes, and so he starts toward the violent, miserable, beggar-filled city to find them. Along the way he runs across a freezing little girl and decides to save her—despite the advice of “the dog,” an imaginary companion who offers cold, survivalist advice from the dog skull Willo keeps lashed to his hat. At its best, this bleak debut recalls Patrick Ness’ The Knife of Never Letting Go (2008) and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road (2006), with the brave young narrator navigating the horrors of a wasted world in broken English (“she look like a worm do”). There is a staginess to the ending that feels incongruous with the naturalistic style of the rest of the book, but nevertheless this marks Crockett as a writer to watch. -- Kraus, Daniel (Reviewed 03-01-2012) (Booklist, vol 108, number 13, p78)
  • /* Starred Review */ Gr 8 Up — What if, instead of a warmer future, "every thing got proper cold"? What if "the seas stopped working," and those who didn't move to the crowded, smelly cities approved by the government became "stealers" and "stragglers" and lived off the grid? Russia and China are big influences in this new order, and the yuan is the preferred currency. Willo's family are stragglers, living in the frigid mountains of Wales. Willo has a talent for hunting and helps his father turn hides into finely crafted coats, boots, and gloves. Cat and dog make the finest furs, though Willo catches mostly rabbits. When he returns from a hunt to find the cabin deserted, he knows something bad has happened. He packs a sled with supplies and heads off to find his family. His first encounter is with Mary, almost starving, whose father is a pony man, also missing. Willo intends to take Mary only as far as the power lines, where she can be picked up by a snow truck, but events tumble both teens onto a transport into the city. The bones of this story are not new: civilization trying to reform after human-caused catastrophe. Some people try to make a better world, and others ask only what's in it for them. What elevates Snow is the voice Crockett uses to tell the tale. Willo's narration, with misspellings and inventive phrasings, is a voice we have not heard before. Graphic violence occurs in several places, but Crockett's cold, brutal world is not without a few warm rooms where travelers can rest and prepare for the next challenge.—Maggie Knapp, Trinity Valley School, Fort Worth, TX --Maggie Knapp (Reviewed March 1, 2012) (School Library Journal, vol 58, issue 03, p152)
  • /* Starred Review */ In this powerful first novel, global warming has killed the North Atlantic Current, sending the U.K. and much of the U.S. into a new ice age. Fifteen-year-old Willo—born in the barren, snow-covered mountains of northern Wales—has never known anything but the cold; half-feral, he barely listens when his father tells him stories of the times before the weather changed. Coming home from a day on the mountain, however, he finds his family has been taken away by government men. Then, heading back up the mountain, seeking refuge from the weather, cannibals, and feral dogs, Willo stumbles on two abandoned children. His first instinct is to “go quick away from those kids just standing all frozen and starving with their dark eyes begging me,” but his basic humanity eventually intervenes. This brutal and at times terrifying postapocalyptic tale features a well-developed first-person narrator, strong secondary characters, and spare but compelling language. Despite its grim take on humanity’s willingness to do evil, it also demonstrates that, even under the most straitened circumstances, people are capable of unexpected kindness and altruism. Ages 12–up. Agent: Greenhouse Literary Agency. (Mar.) --Staff (Reviewed January 16, 2012) (Publishers Weekly, vol 259, issue 03, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Debut author Crockett's poetic first-person narrative depicts an adolescent's coming of age amid wartime havoc and an unforgiving, possibly post-apocalyptic winter. When Willo's family vanishes from their wintry cabin, he sets out on his own to find them, leaving his home in the hills for the nearby town, which is undergoing a Nazi-like occupation. The war is a nebulous monster; though Crockett alludes to World War II, she never fully explicates the novel's timeframe, which may frustrate some readers. Willo's inventive argot is part–urban vernacular and part–forester twang, and though it offers no clues as to setting or time, it conveys exceptional metaphors that evoke nature and the elements. People Willo has trusted betray him in the face of scarce food and the authorities' hunt for a faceless resistance, but he perseveres, seizing opportunities to earn his bread and doggedly pursuing information about his father. On his journey he meets a young girl who turns out to possess unexpected significance in the political landscape, figuring even in his own legacy, a thing he discovers in his difficult search. Willo endures cruel brutality, but Crockett renders in him an intense psychological transformation that is authentic to his character and his circumstances, culminating in discovery of his own voice and vision. A sentimental tale of hardships, resilience and first-time experiences that illustrates a universal truism: Hope springs eternal in the young. (Fiction. 12 & up)(Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2012)
Awards note
Morris Debut Award finalist, 2013
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10091773
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Crockett, S. D.
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 8
  • 12
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Survival
  • Voyages and travels
  • Missing persons
  • Winter
  • Survival
  • Adventure and adventurers
  • Voyages and travels
  • Missing persons
  • Winter
  • Science fiction
  • JUVENILE FICTION
  • JUVENILE FICTION
  • Missing persons
  • Survival
  • Voyages and travels
  • Winter
Target audience
pre adolescent
Label
After the snow, S.D. Crockett
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn733231295
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
288 pages
Isbn
9780312641696
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2011036122
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)733231295
Label
After the snow, S.D. Crockett
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn733231295
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
288 pages
Isbn
9780312641696
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2011036122
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)733231295

Library Locations

    • Milwood BranchBorrow it
      12500 Amherst Dr, Austin, TX, 78727, US
      30.4223444 -97.7161692
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