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The Resource Ackamarackus : Julius Lester's sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables, illustrated by Emilie Chollat

Ackamarackus : Julius Lester's sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables, illustrated by Emilie Chollat

Label
Ackamarackus : Julius Lester's sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables
Title
Ackamarackus
Title remainder
Julius Lester's sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables
Statement of responsibility
illustrated by Emilie Chollat
Title variation
  • Julius Lester's sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables
  • Sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables
Title variation remainder
Julius Lesters sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables
Creator
Contributor
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A collection of six original fables with morals both silly and serious
Review
  • Ages 4-8. Lester lets his funny side out in six inventive, original fables featuring animals we’d like to meet. Bernard the Bee loses his buzz after a lovelorn, watery encounter with a bluebird but teams up with a balalaika-playing honey to be all that he can “bee.” Female lions Liora, Loretta, and Letty are exasperated with the always sleeping Lionel but find a way to turn his snoozing to their advantage, proving “you can be a genius at anything,” even sleeping. Ellen the eagle wonders about the air holding her up, and Adalbert the Alligator finds Vermont, rather than Florida, to his liking. Lester’s delicious wordplay is infectious and reflected in the use of display type in various sizes and colors. The acrylic-and-collage images make use of flat geometric shapes, matte colors, and googly expressions to reflect the silliness rampant in the text. The fabulous world of the title, Ackamarackus, is defined on the back jacket as, among other things, “nonsense, malarkey.” (Reviewed February 1, 2001) -- GraceAnne DeCandido
  • K-Gr 5-Each of the six tales in this riotous collection features irrepressible animals, laugh-out-loud descriptions, alliterative language, turns of phrase that dance off the tongue, and two pithy morals brimming with wisdom and wit. There's Ellen the Eagle, afraid of heights, including her native mountaintop. She finds her niche posing for federal posters and stamps and ultimately makes her home in a D.C. penthouse. In this and other stories, listeners will read about creatures learning to be true to themselves, to value their own and other's uniqueness, and to be careful about negative feelings like anger and judgment. Chollat's expressive acrylic-and-collage, single-page scenes and isolated images add to the fun. The flat, highly saturated illustrations combine a retro flavor, askewed horizons, and a colorful mixture of fonts. The playful lettering is incorporated into portions of the text as well. With asides to the audience, a distinctive voice, and tidbits aimed at a wide range of ages, it's as if Lester were right in the room spinning his stories.-Wendy Lukehart, Dauphin County Library, Harrisburg, PA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
  • Puns and alliteration abound in Lester's (To Be a Slave; Sam and the Tigers) roundup of six zany, zippy tales. The author introduces some cockeyed characters, among them a bee who falls in love with a balalaika-playing girl bee and learns to play the bongos after he loses his buzz ("A bee without a buzz would be a used-to-be bee who was now a been"), a lion whose wives find a way to cash in on his laziness and an alligator who beats the Florida heat by moving to Vermont. An inventive counterpoint to Aesop's approach, Lester's fables conclude with a pair of morals some entirely absurd, some with a tinge of truth listed under the heading, "Which proves two things" (the bee tale, for instance, concludes with: "1. Always be all that you can bee./ 2. Why buzz when you can balalaika?"). French artist Chollat reinforces the farce and folly of the narrative in her boldly hued acrylics and collage illustrations. For "The Flies Learn to Fly," she pictures the students at fly school dressed in gingham, polka-dot and plaid fabric swatches; cutout letters function as the equivalent of thought balloons. The Oxford English Dictionary's definition of "ackamarackus" appears on the back cover, which reads in part, "A `tall' story, a hackneyed tale, nonsense, malarkey." Which proves two things: 1. This book is most appropriately titled; and 2. This is Lester at his most preposterous and playful. Ages 4-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
  • The author of What a Truly Cool World (1999) twangs his silly bone again, producing six fables that are well south of serious, though carrying kernels of truth. Several are "lost and found" tales, as in "Ellen the Eagle Finds Her Place in the World," modeling for the government—because she's afraid of heights. There's Bernard the bee, who unexpectedly finds true love even though he's lost his buzz, and "Anna the Angry Ant," who finds herself with a permanent stomach ache after losing her temper and swallowing an anaconda. Chollat makes her US debut with a set of stylized, postmodern illustrations whose bright hues are picked up by colored words or lines in the facing text. Lester's distinctive way with words is fully in evidence here—"What would a bee be without a buzz? My goodness! A bee without a buzz would be a been. A bee without a buzz would be a used-to-be bee who was now a been. So Bernard buzzed his buzz a couple of times and was happy to see that his buzz was as buzzy as it always was"—and he closes each tale with a double moral: "1. You are what you think you are and not what others think you aren't. 2. When you're in Vermont, WATCH OUT FOR THE ALLIGATOR." There's a lot of text on these oversized pages, much of it asking for a sophisticated comprehension. So the format is deceptively young-looking and might throw off the child who could understand the jokes. Readers who find Aesop's fables stodgy and Jon Scieszka's incomprehensible might want to have a go at these. (Illustrated fiction. 9-11) (Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2001)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
111812
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Lester, Julius
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Intended audience
AD730L
Intended audience source
Lexile
Interest level
LG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 0
  • 5
Reading level
4.1
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chollat, Emilie
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Fables
  • Animals
Target audience
primary
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Julius Lester's sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables
Label
Ackamarackus : Julius Lester's sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables, illustrated by Emilie Chollat
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
396478
Dimensions
32 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
40 pages
Isbn
9780590489133
Isbn Type
(hardcover : alk. paper)
Lccn
00037185
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780590489133
  • (Sirsi) ADA-5366
Label
Ackamarackus : Julius Lester's sumptuously silly fantastically funny fables, illustrated by Emilie Chollat
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
396478
Dimensions
32 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
40 pages
Isbn
9780590489133
Isbn Type
(hardcover : alk. paper)
Lccn
00037185
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780590489133
  • (Sirsi) ADA-5366

Library Locations

    • North Village BranchBorrow it
      2505 Steck Ave, Austin, TX, 78757, US
      30.362144 -97.7305032
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