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The Resource A little yellow dog : an Easy Rawlins mystery, Walter Mosley

A little yellow dog : an Easy Rawlins mystery, Walter Mosley

Label
A little yellow dog : an Easy Rawlins mystery
Title
A little yellow dog
Title remainder
an Easy Rawlins mystery
Statement of responsibility
Walter Mosley
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Easy Rawlins, working as a school janitor in Los Angeles, is seduced by a teacher into taking her dog, which her husband is threatening to kill. When the husband is murdered, Rawlins becomes the prime suspect and must clear his name. By the author of Black Betty
Member of
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
Library Journal Best Books, 1996.
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ Most successful mystery series find a good groove and stay put, holding their audience with the pleasures of familiarity. Only the best crime writers, like James Lee Burke (see opposite page), manage to rework their grooves, staying put but never letting comfort supersede substance. Then there's Walter Mosley, whose Easy Rawlins mysteries break most of the rules. By allowing Easy to grow older in real time (in five books, the series has moved from the mid-1940s through 1963), Mosley forces himself to reinvent his hero in every book, asking readers to accept change in a series character much as we would in ourselves, gradually but inevitably. In this installment, Easy has moved away from the street life that has alternately attracted and repelled him in the past; he's working as a building engineer at a Los Angeles junior high school, raising his two adopted children, and struggling to avoid the storm clouds of discontent that continue to gather both in the nation and in his South Central L.A. home as the 1960s grind on. Then an impulsive decision to help a beautiful schoolteacher hide her yapping dog from an angry husband threatens to jeopardize Easy's hard-won island of security. Soon he becomes a top suspect in two murders and must return to the street if he is to extricate himself from the mess. Mosley lets his plot unravel with the skill of a genre veteran, but as always, it is his ability to set Easy's personal story in the context of the historical moment that gives this series its uniqueness. November 1963 isn't just ambience here; it's counterpoint to the drama of an individual black man realizing that his world will never be the same again. A superb novel in a superb series. ((Reviewed May 1, 1996)) -- Bill Ott
  • YA--Easy Rawlins makes another appearance in this fast-moving mystery set in the African American community of Los Angeles in the 1960s. Although the story is filled with murder, drugs, and intrigue, it is an upbeat one that will appeal to urban YAs. Easy Rawlins is a likable fellow who works as a supervisory janitor in Sojourner Truth Junior High School and struggles to provide a loving and supportive home to two youngsters he rescued from the streets. Roman Gasteau is found murdered on the school grounds; his twin brother is discovered dead; and his wife, Idabell Turner, a teacher, is also slain. Idabell's little yellow dog somehow seems to be at the core of this string of murders. Easy has served his time on the streets of L.A., creating an underground world of friends and contacts in the process. The mutual respect and love between him and the many unique characters, coupled with Easy's smooth integration into the African American underworld, help him quickly solve the three related murders. The pace is fast; the characters many; the setting and language rich and authentic; the ending satisfying. Mosely has created another winner.--Dottie Kraft, formerly at Farifax County Public Schools, VA
  • Mosley's fifth outing with Easy Rawlins is no less enjoyable than its predecessors. Set in the early 1960s, this installment finds Easy working in a high school as head custodian for the Board of Education two years after giving up drinking and the "street life." When a corpse turns up on school grounds, Easy finds himself reluctantly caught up in the investigation--between the rock and the hard place of the cops and the killers. Mosley writes in the grand tradition of the American hard-boiled private investigator. His dialog is sharp and his characters vivid--the reader can almost feel the mean L.A. streets. Brimming with sex, deceit, and smoking guns, A Little Yellow Dog is a brawny, gritty, page-turning mystery that's a hell of a fun ride. [BOMC Selection; previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 3/15/95.]--Michael Rogers, "Library Journal"
  • /* Starred Review */ Easy Rawlins has been working for two years as a supervising custodian in Sojourner Truth Junior High School when he finds alluring math teacher Idabell Turner in her classroom much too early one morning for anything but trouble. Armed only with a wild story about how her husband, Holland Gasteau, has threatened to kill her dog, she's got Easy (Black Betty, 1994, etc.) in her arms within minutes, and his carefully constructed life in a shambles. By the end of the day, the Watts police will discover the corpses of both Holland and his twin brother Roman, and they'll be measuring Easy, who's already been accused of stealing from the school, for the rap. Instead of coming clean to the cops about his involvement with Ida, Easy--who knows that the crooked ways he got his job and adopted his children, Jesus and Feather, won't stand up to official scrutiny--decides to go back to the streets he had hoped he'd left behind. Knowing that most of any investigation will be under the table to start with--"You had to kill somebody white to get any kind of news splash in the sixties," he reflects--Easy, backed up by his unusually subdued gangster buddy Mouse, ties the Gasteaus into an elaborate drug-smuggling scheme, and also, by the end, into every unsolved crime of 1963. The fantastically intricate plot is only average for this celebrated series. But no living novelist beats Mosley's nervy sense of what thin ice the solidest-seeming characters build their lives upon, and how terrifying it is to feel the surface crack and shiver. (Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 1996)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
046386
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mosley, Walter
Dewey number
813/.54
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
An Easy Rawlins Mystery
Series volume
5
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Rawlins, Easy (Fictitious character)
  • African American men
  • School custodians
  • Los Angeles (Calif.)
  • African American men
  • Rawlins, Easy (Fictitious character)
  • School custodians
  • California
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
an Easy Rawlins mystery
Label
A little yellow dog : an Easy Rawlins mystery, Walter Mosley
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocm34046313
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
300 pages
Isbn
9780393039245
Lccn
96004231
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)34046313
Label
A little yellow dog : an Easy Rawlins mystery, Walter Mosley
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocm34046313
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
300 pages
Isbn
9780393039245
Lccn
96004231
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)34046313

Library Locations

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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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      30.362144 -97.7305032
    • Willie Mae Kirk BranchBorrow it
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